Lodging Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 14:57:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://threebearsbandb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Lodging Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ 32 32 “My elderly relative has determined that she can no longer take care of herself”: are the costs of her assisted living facility tax deductible? https://threebearsbandb.com/my-elderly-relative-has-determined-that-she-can-no-longer-take-care-of-herself-are-the-costs-of-her-assisted-living-facility-tax-deductible/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 14:33:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/my-elderly-relative-has-determined-that-she-can-no-longer-take-care-of-herself-are-the-costs-of-her-assisted-living-facility-tax-deductible/ By Andrew Keshner “She was basically asked to go there after post-operative rehabilitation” Dear tax specialist, I have an elderly relative in an assisted living facility in Indiana. She was basically asked to go there from post-op rehab because they determined she couldn’t take care of herself anymore. Monthly living expenses include room/board, the cost […]]]>

By Andrew Keshner

“She was basically asked to go there after post-operative rehabilitation”

Dear tax specialist,

I have an elderly relative in an assisted living facility in Indiana. She was basically asked to go there from post-op rehab because they determined she couldn’t take care of herself anymore.

Monthly living expenses include room/board, the cost of diabetic care and the fee for a moderate nursing aide package (which can go up or down depending on the amount of help they deem necessary for her).

Are any of these monthly fees tax deductible as medical expenses?

In search of family

Dear looking out,

I wish your loved one a full and speedy recovery. I bet it’s been hard on her and her whole family, including you. The good news is that the tax code can help.

Some, if not all, of the costs you describe are deductible medical expenses, according to the tax experts I interviewed. Making the medical expense deduction work for your loved one may take some extra effort, but it could definitely pay off.

Claiming medical expenses can be “a pain in the tail because it requires keeping records,” said Letha Sgritta McDowell, outgoing president of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys.

But at a time when medical care is so expensive and inflation is eating away at budgets, the money spent and the amount of potential deduction is likely worth it, she said.

Tom Bayer, partner in charge of the Indianapolis office for Sikich, a tax, accounting and consulting firm, made the same point. “Part of [the expenses]and potentially all of that, could be deductible,” he said. Sure, there are extra efforts to amass records, but “unless they’re just really rich, you’re going to amass a lot.

The starting point

The IRS code contains the standard deduction and the itemized deduction. Taxpayers can only deduct medical expenses when they itemize their deductions. In addition to medical expenses, other itemized deductions include mortgage interest, state and local taxes, and charitable contributions.

The majority of Americans opt for the standard deduction. Through mid-July, 126.6 million returns claimed the standard deduction while 11.7 million returns were itemized, according to IRS data.

Why the imbalance?

This makes more sense because the size of the write-off that comes from the standard deduction is greater than the size of the write-off that could come from adding all the itemized deductions.

When Americans file their federal income taxes early next year, the standard deduction will be $12,950 for individuals and $25,900 for married couples filing jointly. For people age 65 or older, the standard deduction is $14,700 for individuals and $27,300 for married couples filing jointly. There is also an additional deduction amount if the taxpayer is legally blind.

I don’t know your parent’s age and marital status, but for the money to make sense, the sum of his itemized deductions should exceed the applicable standard deduction amount.

This might be easy to do if we discuss medical care and assisted living. Last year, the median monthly cost of an assisted living facility was $4,500, according to Genworth Financial

If these estimates are any guide, even a brief stay for your relative can rack up enough costs to turn an itemized deduction into the best decision.

tax details

Taxpayers can deduct the amount of medical and dental expenses that exceed 7.5% of adjusted gross income (AGI). For reference, the AGI is number line 11 of the 1040 in the 2021 tax year. The medical expense deduction is claimed on Schedule A.

Say your relative earns $70,000 a year (which is roughly the median income for that year in America): applying 7.5% to $70,000 gives $5,250, so that initial $5,250 in medical expenses cannot be deducted. But eligible medical expenses in addition to this initial sum can be deducted. Again, there is a good chance that the cost of your loved one’s care will exceed this amount.

So what is deductible?

“Medical care expenditures include payments for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, or payments for treatments affecting any structure or function of the body,” the IRS says.

This may include hospital care and “nursing home care, if the availability of medical care is the main reason for being in the nursing home, including the cost of meals and accommodation charged by the hospital or the nursing home,” the tax agency said. .

(Surely families and health care providers know there are differences between assisted living facilities and nursing homes, but the IRS explainers on “assisted living” refer to tax rules applicable to retirement homes.)

Long-term care can benefit from the deduction as long as it is “required by a person with a chronic illness” and also “provided in accordance with a plan of care prescribed by a licensed medical professional”, says the IRS.

Someone is “chronically ill” – according to the IRS – if a licensed medical professional declares that the person cannot carry out at least two parts of daily life without assistance for at least 90 days. This includes eating, dressing, bathing and going to the bathroom.

I don’t know the extent of the care your loved one needs, but she wouldn’t be in an assisted living facility if she didn’t need at least some help.

Other eligible expenses include insurance premiums, and this includes Medicare premiums and Medicare supplemental insurance. Don’t forget co-pay for prescriptions, medical transportation costs to get to appointments and more, McDowell said.

For anyone adding up the costs to determine whether to itemize, “once you get close because you have even a few months of these expenses, it becomes a much larger number than most people realize. had planned,” she noted.

Additional insurance

There are additional steps your parent should consider, McDowell said. For clients in similar situations, McDowell advises having their primary care physician sign a letter stating that the person was “chronically ill” or had a “chronic illness” and that the stay in a nursing home or residence- services was “in accordance with a plan of care.”

You don’t have to submit this letter to the IRS, but keep it on file in case of an audit years later, McDowell said. The same goes for receipts and bills documenting the cost of care, she added.

Another place to get something in writing for tax records is the assisted living facility itself, Bayer said. For these facilities, “this is not a new issue,” he said.

There are plenty of potentially deductible expenses, but if you can’t search records for every last bit of cost, don’t worry, McDowell said. Get as many as you can – plus the bigger costs, like assisted living bills, should be easy to get.

I don’t know how your loved one pays for all incidental fees and expenses.

But if she’s tapping into an IRA to cover the costs — a common move McDowell sees — there may be additional pitfalls making the deduction even more necessary.

Without getting into the thicket of rules and exceptions regarding early IRA withdrawals and required minimum distributions, using the IRA will likely be a taxable event resulting in a higher tax bill. The medical expense deduction is there to counter the rising income tax bill, McDowell said.

“It’s such an important balance. If you don’t do it, people can be a world of trouble from a tax standpoint.”

Hope this helps, and again, a full and speedy recovery to your loved one.

A tax question? Email me at: akeshner@marketwatch.com

Thanks for reading. I want to help you think more broadly about the issues affecting your taxes. I don’t offer tax advice, just an attempt to consider what the whirlwind of tax rules and economic conditions might mean for your wallet.

I’m here for the reader who faces his taxes with an air of resignation. You don’t like taxes too much, I understand. I was once that guy. Beneath the jargon, think of your taxes as a maze – with money at the end. Or a trap you need to avoid.

-Andrew Keshner

 

(END) Dow Jones Newswire

11/24/22 0933ET

Copyright (c) 2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

]]>
Visit Lebanon Valley moves into its own office https://threebearsbandb.com/visit-lebanon-valley-moves-into-its-own-office/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 03:02:29 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/visit-lebanon-valley-moves-into-its-own-office/ Visit Lebanon Valley, a non-profit organization that provides information on entertainment, accommodation, restaurants and everything else to visitors to the county, has moved to a new location in the North Cornwall Commons. Now located at 115 Springwood Dr. Suite 500, the Visit Lebanon Valley Welcome Center is also home to Lebanon Lilly, the organization’s official […]]]>
]]>
Victory within reach for Esmeralda Soria in the CA Assembly race https://threebearsbandb.com/victory-within-reach-for-esmeralda-soria-in-the-ca-assembly-race/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 03:03:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/victory-within-reach-for-esmeralda-soria-in-the-ca-assembly-race/ Democrat Esmeralda Soria will face Republican Mark Pazin in the 27th District Assembly race in November. Fresno Bee File Fresno City Councilwoman Esmeralda Soria continues to hold a slim but increasingly secure lead over Mark Pazin in their controversial contest to represent the 27th Assembly District in the California Legislature. The latest results also clear […]]]>

title=

Democrat Esmeralda Soria will face Republican Mark Pazin in the 27th District Assembly race in November.

Fresno Bee File

Fresno City Councilwoman Esmeralda Soria continues to hold a slim but increasingly secure lead over Mark Pazin in their controversial contest to represent the 27th Assembly District in the California Legislature.

The latest results also clear up many of the Fresno County races, but a congressional seat remains too close to call.

After updated election results Friday afternoon in Fresno and Madera counties, Democrat Soria has 44,784 votes, or 51.2 percent, while Republican Mark Pazin, the former Merced County sheriff, has 42,734, or 48.8%. The margin of around 2,050 votes is only a slight change from the midweek totals.

The 27th District includes parts of Fresno, Merced, and Madera counties. Across all three counties, regardless of district, there are approximately 3,300 ballots left to be processed and counted.

For Pazin to make up the difference on Soria, not only would the lion’s share of those unprocessed ballots have to come from voters in the 27th District, but Pazin would have to garner the vast majority.

One North Valley race that remains highly uncertain is in the 13th congressional district. This hotly contested election pitted longtime National Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced, against Republican businessman and farmer John Duarte of Hughson.

Since election night Nov. 8, the lead has wavered between the two men, and at no time has the margin even reached a percentage point.

That did not change after Friday’s updates from Fresno and Madera counties, which are part of the district along with Merced County and parts of San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties.

Duarte now has 63,539 votes, or 50.3% of the votes counted to date, compared to 62,674 for Gray – a margin of 865 votes or six tenths of a percentage point.

The California secretary of state’s office reported Friday that Stanislaus and San Joaquin counties still have more than 60,000 ballots to process and count. But it’s unclear how many of those ballots came from voters in the 13th District.

The 13th remains closely watched nationally as a victory for Duarte would add to the narrow margin the Republican Party has now secured in the U.S. House of Representatives, while a victory for Gray would strengthen the position of the Democrats in as a minority party.

In addition to multi-county races for the Assembly and House of Representatives, Fresno County’s latest update helped consolidate results in a slew of local contests starting in the Nov. 8 midterm general election. .

Unified Fresno

In one of the Fresno Unified School District’s most closely watched board races, incumbent Veva Islas widened her lead over challenger Karen Steed, a retired FUSD teacher, for area seat. from McLane High School in the district.

The margin between the two candidates, which was as narrow as 25 votes on election night, increased to 325 votes. That gives Islas nearly 45% of the vote, compared to Steed’s 39.7%. Chemist Michelle Scire, a second challenger, trails with 15.2%.

There was talk of a possible recount in that race, according to Islas, although Steed neither confirmed nor denied his intentions to request one during an interview on Tuesday.

As for the other three Fresno Unified seats that were up for election, two incumbents and a challenger maintained command trails with every count updated since election night.

In the Bullard High School area, challenger Susan Wittrup, a retired FUSD school psychologist, edges out incumbent Terry Slatic, a retired United States Marine Corps major, by nearly 6,000 votes. She took 58% of the vote against 26% for Slatic. FUSD teacher James Barr and retired FUSD campus security assistant Michael Haynes are third and fourth with 11.7% and 4.3% of the vote respectively.

Holders of the remaining two races swooped in on election night and have retained them ever since. Keshia Thomas, the incumbent of Edison High in the district, maintains a massive lead of more than 2,000 votes over her only opponent Wayne Horton. Thomas has 76% to Horton’s 23.8%.

Fresno Unified’s Sunnyside High area titular Valerie F. Davis is in first place in a group of four by just under 2,000 votes. She leads with 47.4% to second place to alternative educator Karl C. Diaz with about 23.3% of the vote. Educator Tammy McMahon-Gorans follows with 20.7% of the vote, and marketer Michael Osmer is in last place with 8.5%.

Unified Clovis

Little has also changed in Clovis Unified’s two races on the ballot.

Clint Olivier, a nonprofit executive and former Fresno City Council member, still leads the competition for the district’s Zone 1 seat with more than 4,000 votes. He took communications consultant Samantha Bauer’s 39.3% to 32.4%. Businessman Chuck Der Manouel and real estate agent Joanne Burton trailed with around 23.5% and 4.6% of the vote, respectively.

In the race for the Zone 6 seat, parent and teacher Deena Combs-Flores leads easily with more than 14,000 votes. She took 62% of retired business owner Bill Whitmore’s 37.9%.

Clovis Town Hall

The departure of two Clovis City Council incumbents meant there would be at least two newcomers after the November 8 election results were finalized. The top voters remain unchanged from election night among the crowded field of 10 candidates. Voters were asked to select up to three candidates on the ballot.

Incumbent Drew Bessinger continues to lead the overall race with 21.5% of the vote, while Republican party activist Diane Pearce is second with 20.9%. Matt Basgall heads for the third council seat with 20.1% of the vote. Over 85,000 votes were counted in the contest.

The three are safely ahead of their closest rival, Joshua Phanco, who garnered 8.2% of the vote. No other candidate exceeded 7% in the electoral results.

Local ballot measures

No big change has occurred in the results of four important local ballot measures that were put to Fresno County voters last week. Three sales tax measures are all being defeated, while a tax on hotel rooms/lodging in the town of Clovis far outweighs it.

Fresno County Measure C: The proposal to extend the Fresno County half-cent sales tax for another 30 years to help pay for road and transportation improvements still seems doomed. The “yes” votes for measure C so far total 121,787 votes, or 58.03%. But that falls short of the two-thirds majority, or 66.67%, required to pass. Nearly 42% of voters said no to the extension of the tax.

Fresno County E-Measurement: The 0.2% countywide sales tax proposed to support improvements to college programs as well as facilities in Fresno State required a simple majority of 50% plus one vote to pass. But despite a massive campaign endorsed by Fresno entrepreneur and developer Richard Spencer, Measure E is heading for defeat as 53.1% of voters rejected the measure. This compares to 46.9% who voted yes.

Measure M of the city of Fresno: The 0.125 percent sales tax proposed by the Fresno City Council to provide money for veterans’ programs and facilities falls far short of the two-thirds majority needed to pass. Of nearly 100,000 votes cast in the city, Measure M had received “yes” votes from about 59.2% of voters, compared to “no” votes at 40.8%.

Clovis City Measure B: Measure B before the voters of the city of Clovis propose to increase the tourist tax on hotels and accommodation from the current rate of 10% to 12%. With over 36,000 votes cast and counted so far, he is heading for an easy victory with 69.7%, topping ‘no’ votes at 30.3%. Measure B required a simple majority of 50% plus one vote to pass.

Julianna Morano, a journalist at the Fresno Bee Education Lab, contributed to this report.

This story was originally published November 18, 2022 7:03 p.m.

Fresno Bee Related Stories

Lifelong Valley resident Tim Sheehan has worked as a reporter and editor in the area since 1986 and has worked for The Fresno Bee since 1998. He is currently The Bee’s data reporter and also covers the California High Speed ​​Rail Project and other transportation issues. He grew up in Madera, has a degree in journalism from Fresno State and a master’s degree in leadership studies from Fresno Pacific University.
Support my work with a digital subscription
]]>
Spear withdraws request for lodging tax increase https://threebearsbandb.com/spear-withdraws-request-for-lodging-tax-increase/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 17:34:30 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/spear-withdraws-request-for-lodging-tax-increase/ It was a full house and several letters were read out during public comment when a recent item on Ely City Council’s agenda caused great concern among non-profits and citizens of the whole county. The article? Councilor Ed Spear had requested approval of the agenda item to increase the percentage of the transitional accommodation tax […]]]>

It was a full house and several letters were read out during public comment when a recent item on Ely City Council’s agenda caused great concern among non-profits and citizens of the whole county.

The article? Councilor Ed Spear had requested approval of the agenda item to increase the percentage of the transitional accommodation tax collected by the city from 2.5% to 5% for the Capital Improvement Fund.

This would have taken effect on January 1, with a subsequent increase of 1% for the general fund.

This would have been an increase in the hospitality industry that would have impacted hospitality businesses by 15% for their customers, which in turn would have affected restaurants, special events and retail stores, leaving an economic impact on the whole county.

Spear’s calculations in the documentation provided for the meeting would have left the White Pine Tour & Recreation Board less than $60,000 per year to operate above fixed expenses.

Essentially, this decision would have eliminated all tourism marketing and support for non-profit organizations through the Organizational Assistance ($74,550), Capital ($71,000) and Outdoor Recreation grants ( $49,000). The other supporting elements for Main Street, WP Public Museum, etc. would also be eliminated.

But before any of that could be discussed, at the start of the meeting, Ely Town Mayor Nathan Robertson asked if any items should be taken off the agenda. Ed Spear quickly requested that this item be removed.

Several local residents were already in the crowd, and while some stood and thanked Spear for removing the object, some had quite a few words for Spear whose term ends after this week.

White Pine Corral Association corral boss Kent Lynskey stood and thanked the tour and recreation board.

“We have a new arena, a stringing dummy to help train those interested in stringing, and many other things, without them we couldn’t have made it as far as we have,” did he declare.

Mitch McVicars, with the Bristlecone Bowmen, stood before council and the mayor and echoed Lynskey’s comment, noting the tremendous help from the White Pine Tourism and Recreation Board.

Bill Wolf said: “Even though the agenda item has been crossed out for this meeting, I would like to say that I am opposed to having this item on the agenda, and I’m sure we we’ll all be here the next time he shows up. ”

“I’m a small business owner, I oppose Section 4, it’s sad it even got here. We are a small business trying to survive and it seemed like the support from the City of Ely wasn’t supporting us, so it’s sad to see this on the agenda,” said Luis Tristan.

Several letters were read, all from non-profit organizations such as the White Pine Horse Race Committee, Lund Rodeo Association, Ely Outdoor Enthusiasts and several others who rely heavily on grants from the Tours and Recreation Board, explaining the success of their events. with the help of the board of directors.

The article even touched a nerve with former mayor Melody VanCamp. In her letter, which she asked to read, she explained that when the city first decided to institute the transitional tax several years ago, it was to give the city the opportunity to obtain a funding for infrastructure, maintenance and improvements.

“It was not intended to rob, steal, rip or break the Tour and Rec board,” VanCamp’s letter said. “I remember several years ago when the city was considering a transitional tax, Councilor Spear was employed by the convention center (visiting and recreation council) and was adamantly against this tax as it would have affected his travels . Why this sudden change of mind Mr. Spear? Are you ready to decimate Tour and Rec before leaving office? VanCamp said.

Kyle Horvath, director of the White Pine Tourism and Recreation Board, stood in front of the council and thanked Spear for removing the article.

“I look forward to continuing to work with all of you,” Horvath said. “I want to thank everyone in the community for the support this week. It’s very humbling, it’s really the community that makes this job so rewarding.

Travel Nevada reported a single number when it comes to visitor spending. In 2021, visitor spending reached nearly $51 million in White Pine County. That’s nearly $3 million more than visitor spending in 2019 (pre-pandemic). Visitor spending in 2021 also sustained 12.6% of White Pine County’s jobs.

Although 415 jobs were directly supported by travel and tourism in White Pine in 2021, the total number of jobs impacted by travel and tourism was 654, meaning that 239 jobs were impacted secondarily.

The new members of Ely City Council will be seated on November 17. Councilors Spear and Flangas chose not to run, Terrill Trask who was not opposed will be seated and the individual elected after this week, between Samantha Elliott and Bruce Setterstrom will also be seated.

]]>
Australian Taxation Office fines for late filing of annual returns and GST payments set to increase https://threebearsbandb.com/australian-taxation-office-fines-for-late-filing-of-annual-returns-and-gst-payments-set-to-increase/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:25:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/australian-taxation-office-fines-for-late-filing-of-annual-returns-and-gst-payments-set-to-increase/ The Tax Institute’s managing director of tax policy and advocacy, Scott Treatt, said practitioners and their clients should pay close attention to filing deadlines as fines are increasing by more than 35%. In line with inflation, the increase comes amid rising costs of living and pressure on Australian households. “The high inflation environment of the […]]]>

The Tax Institute’s managing director of tax policy and advocacy, Scott Treatt, said practitioners and their clients should pay close attention to filing deadlines as fines are increasing by more than 35%.

In line with inflation, the increase comes amid rising costs of living and pressure on Australian households.

“The high inflation environment of the past three years means that the indexation provided by law could increase late filing penalties by more than 35% from the current level, to more than $300 per penalty unit.

“This is a significant increase, which will take effect from July 1, 2023, just six months after this latest increase.”

For tax purposes, penalty units are used for fines when taxpayers do not provide the required data. Automated failure to file penalties may be applied to late filed returns, reports and statements.

“In some cases, such as criminal activity and willful avoidance of tax liability, severe penalties may be appropriate,” Treatt said.

“For taxpayers who simply file a little late, it’s a significant cost. The Commissioner retains and exercises the power to waive sanctions in certain cases.

“For taxpayers, this means understanding their rights and the process for appealing a penalty. For those without a tax agent, this can be very tricky.

“We are warning taxpayers and tax experts; they must be more vigilant in updating their tax obligations to avoid the risk of these increased penalties.

Avoidance, extensive compliance repression

The budget also included a new crackdown on tax avoidance through working Australianssmall businesses and multinationals, are expected to generate $4.7 billion in additional revenue over four years.

Dr. Chalmers expanded successful ATO compliance programs, including the Tax Avoidance and Underground Economy Task Forces, as well as the Personal Income Tax Compliance Program.

Accountants and tax agents deemed “high risk” due to questionable past behavior will also come under increased scrutiny as the Tax Practitioners Board is tasked with additional compliance activities. Poor quality or illegal advice will be targeted.

Tax Commissioner Chris Jordan said this month that Australians owed $45billion to the taxman, after a nearly 70 per cent explosion in Unpaid taxes during the COVID-19 crisis.

Uncollected and uncontested tax debt rose from $26.5 billion in mid-2019 to $44.8 billion on June 30 this year, after widespread economic disruption due to the pandemic and leniency granted to taxpayers in trouble by the ATO.

]]>
Mulhall Chronicle: True electoral malaise https://threebearsbandb.com/mulhall-chronicle-true-electoral-malaise/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 21:50:27 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/mulhall-chronicle-true-electoral-malaise/ It’s the day after the election, and I find myself once again on the wrong side. As I mentioned before, I’m pretty used to this. It’s like a majority of voters can look to me for advice on how not to vote, or so it seems. This election, however, I wasn’t just wrong about that […]]]>

It’s the day after the election, and I find myself once again on the wrong side.

As I mentioned before, I’m pretty used to this. It’s like a majority of voters can look to me for advice on how not to vote, or so it seems.



This election, however, I wasn’t just wrong about that race or that ballot metric. I pretty much blew the curve supporting the losers.

Someone has to.



For some on the political left, the way I voted in Tuesday’s election is unlovingly called “being on the wrong side of history.” It’s a bit like being on the schnide – 0 points in a sporting event – but a little worse because it challenges not athletic prowess, but judgment.

Of course, the Colorado ballot looked better for Democrats than most other states.

The governor’s race was a lock from the start. Governor Polis never even trailed in the polls. If the final tally puts him ahead, don’t be surprised to see Polis’ name mentioned for the 2024 presidential nomination.

The same lopsided odds were especially true for Senator Michael Bennet. Compared to the gubernatorial race, this U.S. Senate race appeared to be competitive, though realistically Joe O’Dea never really came close to unseating Bennet.

The 3rd The District House run was more intriguing. Challenger Adam Frisch battled controversy and Wednesday looked to have picked up a slim victory. By Thursday, however, incumbent Lauren Boebert had risen by about 800 votes.

So much for the red wave, at least in Colorado.

But what particularly interests me is the 2C measure of the local ballot, which, at the time of this writing, passes by nearly 400 votes. I watched the 2C count with interest that rubbed my chin.

2C is an accommodation tax for affordable housing. Among the political issues, affordable housing was a darling of this election.

In addition to 2C, statewide Proposition 123 is being passed, and it also sets aside taxes for affordable housing. Other local ballot measures similar to Glenwood’s 2C appeared on ballots in neighboring communities.

The number of affordable housing measures underscores not only the popularity of the issue, but also the seriousness of Colorado’s affordable housing problem.

In Colorado, perhaps more than in many other states, property values ​​far exceed incomes. As a result, low-income employees new to the labor market find it difficult, if not impossible, to live in the communities where they work. And that’s just to start.

Aside from the scenery and recreational opportunities, little about living in Colorado is beneficial.

What made the issue of affordable housing interesting to me was the last election – you know, the referendum in which Glenwood voters had the opportunity to overturn a city council decision to back the attempted a Glenwood landowner to help alleviate some of our local affordable housing issues?

After Glenwood City Council approved an annexation and rezoning of what was called the 480 Donegan project last November, opposition mounted, petitions circulated and signatures were collected. In the end, Question B on the ballot asked us if we should revoke the Council’s decision to support the project.

B is gone, as is the right of a Glenwood family to develop their land as they see fit.

Fast forward to the 2022 mid-term ballot and Glenwood’s Local Measure 2C – an accommodation tax that will set aside accommodation funds to address the affordable housing problem and create a “Fund Advisory Council Workforce Housing” such as the Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA) – an unelected bureaucracy with a mandate to spend taxes to solve housing affordability.

You can decide for yourself the effectiveness of APCHA’s efforts to address housing affordability in the Valley.

The result will be similar here.

I find it amazing that local voters rejected an individual landowner’s attempt to help meet local affordable housing needs, but then turned around and voted to have local government tax housing and overseeing an advisory council to address the affordable housing issue.

Inasmuch as 2C reflects the consciousness of local voters, it is perhaps fair to say that those of us who live in Glenwood collectively prefer to hand over difficult issues to government, even if that means increased government power, bureaucracy increased and diminished individual rights.

I have never found big government an attractive choice, nationally or locally. Yet that’s what I see in 2C – tacit approval of local government expansion.

Don’t worry, though. I am, after all, on the wrong side of history.

Educators interested in innovating in student STEM education through iMec can email me at mitch.mulhall@gmail.com.

]]>
Local party presidents optimistic ahead of Tuesday | Western Colorado https://threebearsbandb.com/local-party-presidents-optimistic-ahead-of-tuesday-western-colorado/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 07:19:53 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/local-party-presidents-optimistic-ahead-of-tuesday-western-colorado/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

]]>
AZ Big Media The Long-Term Considerations of Regulating Short-Term Rentals https://threebearsbandb.com/az-big-media-the-long-term-considerations-of-regulating-short-term-rentals/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:11:05 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/az-big-media-the-long-term-considerations-of-regulating-short-term-rentals/ Across the country, cities large and small will decide the future of local short-term rental operations and regulations via ballot action on Tuesday, November 8. The topic of short term rental regulation has come to the fore over the years and has proven to be incredibly nuanced with pros and cons that need to be […]]]>

Across the country, cities large and small will decide the future of local short-term rental operations and regulations via ballot action on Tuesday, November 8. The topic of short term rental regulation has come to the fore over the years and has proven to be incredibly nuanced with pros and cons that need to be considered. From outright bans, to imposing taxes and licenses, to imposing lottery schemes and adding new layers of compliance and regulation, there are many factors to consider when is to vote on the regulation of short-term rentals.


READ ALSO: Economic impact of short-term rentals in Arizona reaches $6.6 billion

READ ALSO: Are Short-Term Rental Investors Ruining Arizona’s Real Estate Market?


Understand the implications of short-term rental regulations

Different regulations have varying impacts on community stakeholders, from full-time residents to small businesses. It is important that voters understand what is at stake in these decisions, long and short term, for tourism, municipal tax coffers, the fiscal health of local retailers and suppliers focused on short term rentals, and housing affordability for local workers.

Here are some examples of upcoming short-term rental votes:

In Portland, Oregon, there are two questions on the ballot which would significantly shape the landscape of short-term rentals in the region. Issue A seeks to prohibit non-local businesses and operators from registering short-term rentals, prevent landlords from evicting residents to convert their homes to short-term rentals, and prevent landlords of affordable housing from becoming short-term tenants. Issue B would reduce the number of short-term rentals in the area and increase fines and fees and update the city’s rate structure to $250 for owner-occupied rentals and $750 for unoccupied homes by the owner.

In La Quinta, Calif., voters will weigh in on a ballot initiative that addresses landlords’ rights to rent their own property. If adopted, it would be ending the rights of landlords outside a small commercial district to rent their dwelling for less than 30 days, which is the foundation of the short-term rental business structure. Some owners may seek compensation or damages if their ownership rights are revoked.

In Dillon, Colorado, new lodging and excise taxes for short-term rentals are on the ballot. The ballot initiative will give voters the option to create a 5% excise tax on short-term rentals and raise its lodging tax from 2% to 6%.. These taxes have the potential to raise approximately $3 million in accommodation tax and $1.5 million in excise tax, which would then be used for a variety of projects, including housing renovations, streets and car parks, taking into account the impact of visitors and other city-oriented line elements. improvement.

Impact of short-term rental on the community

While tourism brings crowds and sometimes loud noise, it also brings big vacation dollars to local communities. Shopping, dining and other holiday splurges all go to local retailers and small businesses as they serve short-term rental visitors.

For instance, The San Diego Tourism Marketing District reported that tourism creates 1 in 8 jobs in the city and brings in more than $11 billion a year in visitor spending – not to mention the city’s lodging tax, STR license revenue and more. With San Diego recently passing the Short-Term Residential Occupancy Ordinance, dramatically reducing the number of permitted STRs from the current 13,000 to 5,400, the city risks unintended economic consequences due to future impacts on tourism.

Examples like San Diego demonstrate the inherent gamble of cities reducing their inventory of available housing and hoping to maintain tourism levels. Following recent trends, many families are specifically looking for STRs rather than hotels to better suit their vacation plans. Without these conducive accommodations, a countless percentage of travelers may simply choose alternate locations where STRs are available. This, in turn, has significant ramifications for local retailers. Declining tourist numbers mean less year-round traffic for restaurants, grocery stores, bars, cafes and other businesses serving local visitors. Similarly, companies that directly serve the STR ecosystem would lose a significant portion of their customer base. Cleaners, landscaping companies, property managers, electricians, plumbers, caterers, pool services and so on will all feel the sting of such a significant reduction.

Short-term rentals and affordable housing

Understanding the arguments around affordable housing and the role that short-term rental properties play across cities is complex. Some argue that short-term rentals decrease rental availability for residents by taking a house off the market and turning it into a room for rent, and therefore the price of other available rentals increases with the reduced supply. Others cite inflation, high interest rates and an unstable housing market as causes for the lack of affordable housing. As voters head to the polls, they should look at their specific region and see how short-term rentals affect affordable housing in their specific city or county. One size does not fit all. Understanding the nuances of each area is important because some cities will not necessarily have the same supply and demand for short-term rentals as others, nor the affordable housing deficit.

Short-term rental on the ballot

The vote counts. Residents will shape the future of their city’s relationship with owners of short-term rentals, full-time residents with no stake in the STR business, property managers, small business operators, and tourists. This could mean regulating who can own a short-term rental, what fines and fees are applied, whether landlords are eligible to rent their property, raising taxes on short-term rentals to fund city projects, or even investigate how the short-term rental market is impacting affordable housing. Compliance with these types of regulations will also be important, so short-term rental hosts should pay attention to the voting results of ballot initiatives in their area or hire a property manager to facilitate compliance.

Author: Pam Knudsen is an executive at Avalara, leading multi-tax teams that include lodging, liquor, telecommunications, and sales and use tax. She is a leading voice in vacation rental tax compliance and regulation, in addition to bringing deep experience in software/SaaS technology as well as ERP systems. Pam joined Avalara in 2012.

]]>
Sonoma County suspends tourism fees for vacation rentals https://threebearsbandb.com/sonoma-county-suspends-tourism-fees-for-vacation-rentals/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 22:00:53 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/sonoma-county-suspends-tourism-fees-for-vacation-rentals/ Executives at Sonoma County’s state-funded tourism agency have suspended a plan to apply tax assessment to vacation and short-term rentals following an outcry from these smaller lodging operators. Sonoma County Tourism announced plans in October to apply a 2% Business Improvement Area assessment to the nightly rents that vacation rentals charge guests. The move would […]]]>

Executives at Sonoma County’s state-funded tourism agency have suspended a plan to apply tax assessment to vacation and short-term rentals following an outcry from these smaller lodging operators.

Sonoma County Tourism announced plans in October to apply a 2% Business Improvement Area assessment to the nightly rents that vacation rentals charge guests. The move would have brought the county’s growing number of vacation rentals under the Sonoma County Tourism funding umbrella.

The 2% assessment was estimated to generate an additional $2.1 to $2.5 million in tax revenue per year, according to a report by the County Economic Development Board.

The agency’s 2% assessment already applies to large properties generating revenues over $350,000 a year, according to its website.

Sonoma County Tourism intended to use the funds to increase vacation rental marketing, said Claudia Vecchio, president and CEO of Sonoma County Tourism.

The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors was scheduled to hold a public hearing Tuesday into the proposed assessment, but withdrew the article at the request of Sonoma County Tourism.

“We don’t want to cause more angst among our partners,” Vecchio said in an interview on Monday. “There seemed to be a high level of frustration that we hadn’t heard before.”

The move comes as demand for wine country vacation rentals continues to growespecially in the middle of market and migration developments over the past two years.

Data provided by the Sonoma County Permit Department shows there are 1,822 vacation rentals with completed permits, 72 rentals in progress, 111 pending and 15 with incomplete permit applications.

However, Sonoma County Tourism estimated that there are 3,800 vacation rentals in unincorporated portions of the county, Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Rohnert Park, Sebastopol, Cloverdale, Cotati and Windsor that are required to pay property taxes. ‘accommodation.

During public comment, Eric Fraser, a member of the vacation rental community, used this discrepancy in the numbers to illustrate what he said were challenges impeding communication between Sonoma County Tourism and vacation rental operators. .

“The main obstacle, I think, to really coming together and working together has to be the dispute over facts,” Fraser said.

The tourism agency held two online town hall meetings where vacation rental operators’ frustrations “boiled over,” Vecchio told the board on Tuesday.

Vacation rental owners objected to the new charge, saying it would hurt bookings. They also wondered how the tourism agency benefits small operators compared to large accommodation companies like hotels.

“A lot of these very small traders cite types of price sensitivities,” Vecchio said in Monday’s interview. “We don’t see that in all areas. They work a bit differently than what we get the general glimpse of when they’re so small. »

Sonoma County officials continue to struggle with the balance between the growing vacation rental industry and concerns from neighbors who say the growing number of vacation rental homes is undermining the local housing stock and quality of life while complicating emergency plans for major disasters such as forest fires and floods.

Vecchio told the supervisory board that vacation rentals now make up 46% of the county’s accommodation stock, explaining why the agency wants to include that sector in the tourism levy.

Through business assessment, the tourism bureau collects about $6 million a year from accommodation operators who meet the minimum income threshold of $350,000, according to the county’s Economic Development Board.

Sonoma County Tourism’s planned $9.9 million budget for 2022-23 is also supported by hotel bed fees, or the Transient Occupancy Tax, collected from lodging operators throughout the county.

The nonprofit agency is responsible for marketing the county’s tourism industry by promoting recreation, events and tours and travel, according to its website.

Vecchio said the office has been working on the new funding initiative for two years and plans to resume conversations with vacation rental operators about the valuation in 2023.

“We have plans to try to get this group together and chart a course,” Vecchio said.

You can contact editor Emma Murphy at 707-521-5228 or emma.murphy@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @MurphReports.

]]>
Notice: Vote to renew the departmental accommodation tax https://threebearsbandb.com/notice-vote-to-renew-the-departmental-accommodation-tax/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 20:37:52 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/notice-vote-to-renew-the-departmental-accommodation-tax/ Fremont County is large, diverse, and filled with opinions, or “talking in the 10s.” “Talk in the 10” is an opportunity for you, our readers, to voice and share your thoughts on what’s happening in the community with the community. Letters may have been edited for clarity and length, but have generally been published exactly […]]]>

Fremont County is large, diverse, and filled with opinions, or “talking in the 10s.” “Talk in the 10” is an opportunity for you, our readers, to voice and share your thoughts on what’s happening in the community with the community. Letters may have been edited for clarity and length, but have generally been published exactly as received. The opinions expressed in what follows are the sole responsibility of the author. Send your letters to our editors by emailing opi[email protected]

Dear Editor,

Fremont County voters will be asked when they cast their ballots for the Nov. 8 general election if they wish to renew the county’s 2% lodging tax for another two years. Here are some reasons why I will vote “For”.

Tourism contributes significantly to the economy of Fremont County
Tourism is Cowboy State’s second largest economic driver, providing jobs and decent wages for residents year-round. Last year here in Fremont County – marketed as The Wind River Country in Wyoming — tourism directly supported 1,460 jobs and generated about $54.2 million in wages.

Visitors to Fremont County spent just under $158 million in 2021, representing spending in the following areas:

  • $30.7 million in restaurants (up 16.9% from 2020)
  • $27.8 million in accommodations (up 56.4%)
  • $21.6 million in arts, entertainment and recreation (up 16%)
  • $19.9 million in gasoline and local transportation (+54.7%)
  • $17.4 million in shopping (up 17.6%)
  • $9.8 million in grocery stores (up 18.8%)
  • $1 million in visitor air travel (up 20.7%)

Accommodation tax – The tax we don’t pay

Originally passed in 1989, the new county lodging tax would continue to impose a 2% sales tax on “bedrooms for guests in hotels, motels, tourist grounds, parks trailers, campgrounds, ranches, short-term condominiums and similar establishments”. (for example, Airbnb and VRBO). This tax falls almost exclusively on visitors to Fremont County, and the revenue collected would continue to be directly invested in bringing more visitors – and their dollars – to Fremont County. This is done by the Fremont County Destination Marketing Organization (DMO) and Accommodation Tax Council, the Wind River Visitors Council (WRVC), of which I am currently vice-president. Comprised of representatives from Dubois, Hudson, Lander, Riverton, Shoshoni, and Fremont County, the WRVC exists “to stimulate tourism by creating awareness and encouraging visitation to Wind River Country’s unique destinations, activities, and events.” Fremont County lodging tax revenue for fiscal year 2021/2022 (ending June 30, 2022) reached a record high of $1,016,610.77, significantly higher than the previous record fiscal year 2018/ 2019, which saw a total of $734,689.52 raised.

Investing in the tourist assets of Lander
On behalf of the City of Lander, the Lander Chamber allocates tens of thousands of dollars of lodging tax proceeds each year in the form of Tourism Asset Development (TAD) grants to non-profit organizations and civic organizations whose events and programs attract visitors to Lander. Over the years, there are few, if any, events/programs held or hosted in Lander that have not been supported by a TAD grant from Lander Chamber. A sampling of these include the Pioneer Days Rodeo and Parade, Native American Dances, Lander Presents Summer Concert Series, Fremont Area Tour, Jurassic Classic Mountain Bike Festival, RiverFest srt , Lander Valley Farmers’ Market, One Shot Antelope Hunt, Charity Challenge, Fremont Toyota Shootout, Lander Girls Softball League, International Climbers’ Festival, Lander Brewfest, Wyoming Outdoor Weekend & Expo, Fremont County Pioneer Museum, Sinks Canyon Rough & Tumble Trail Races, Lander Senior Babe Ruth Baseball, Museum of the American West, Lander Art District Street Fair, Garden Expo, Wings n’ Wheels Fly-In/Airshow/Car Show, and many more!

Tourism is the engine of Lander’s economy and makes our small town an attractive destination for tourists. and Locals. Vote “For” to renew the departmental accommodation tax!

Thank you for your time and attention to my comments.

Sincere friendships,

Owen Sweeney

]]>