Occupation Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:07:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://threebearsbandb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Occupation Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ 32 32 Complaint alleges ‘profound and profound anti-Semitic discrimination’ at Berkeley Law School https://threebearsbandb.com/complaint-alleges-profound-and-profound-anti-semitic-discrimination-at-berkeley-law-school/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:01:45 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/complaint-alleges-profound-and-profound-anti-semitic-discrimination-at-berkeley-law-school/ The University of California, Berkeley School of Law suffers from “profound and profound anti-Semitic discrimination,” according to a copy of a complaint filed against the school with the Department of Education and reviewed by the Free Washington Beacon. The complaint — filed last week by a Florida-based attorney and the International Legal Forum, a global […]]]>

The University of California, Berkeley School of Law suffers from “profound and profound anti-Semitic discrimination,” according to a copy of a complaint filed against the school with the Department of Education and reviewed by the Free Washington Beacon.

The complaint — filed last week by a Florida-based attorney and the International Legal Forum, a global watchdog that fights anti-Semitism — alleges anti-Israel and anti-Semitic bias at law school after nine groups Students passed regulations in August banning Zionist speakers from campus.

School’s decision to agree to ban on pro-Israel speakers violates 1964 Civil Rights Act, which bars recipients of federal funds from discriminating on the basis of race and origin nationwide, according to the complaint. The petitioners urge the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights to “immediately initiate an investigation against the University of California, Berkeley Law School” and order it to lift this ban on Zionists.

The complaint comes amid rising anti-Semitism on US college campuses. Assaults on Jewish students and their identity doubled in the 2021-2022 school year, especially in schools with large Jewish populations, the Free tag reported Last week. Last month, at George Washington University, for example, flyers reading “Fuck Zionists” were posted on campus’ Hillel Building, a center for Jewish life. The University of Southern California’s Hillel Building in August was also defaced, with vandals destroying the building’s facade.

The Education Department must determine whether Berkeley’s law violates civil rights law, then force the university to “invalidate the statutes in question,” according to the complaint. The watchdog also wants Berkeley leaders to ensure that any group endorsing anti-Zionist provisions is barred from receiving school funds and revoked its status as a “recognized student organization”. Students and faculty should also be required to participate in training that will foster a campus environment “free from anti-Semitic harassment and discrimination,” according to the complaint.

There is precedent for the Department of Education to get involved in the issue. The federal agency is investigating the University of Southern California over allegations that the school fomented “a hostile environment of anti-Semitism”. This investigation was launched after a watchdog group presented evidence of anti-Semitic discrimination similar to that included in the complaint against Berkeley Law.

A Berkeley Law spokesperson told the Free tag that the school “seeks to avoid commenting on complaints” filed with the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights. The spokesperson also said he was unaware of the specific complaint.

While Berkeley Law officials, including Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, have sought to downplay the issue, with Chemerinsky saying “only a handful of the more than 100 student groups at Berkeley Law have done so,” the attorneys say that this excuse is unacceptable.

“It is unfathomable that a similar statement was ever made that ‘only a handful’ of student groups have banned speakers from any other ethnic, religious or racial group,” states the complaint, which was authored in part by Gabriel Groisman, a Florida-based lawyer and Jewish rights leader. “Yet such blatant discrimination directly directed against Jews is excused, justified and incorporated. The university’s position is untenable under the law.”

The complaint further states that Chemerinsky “neither called for [the groups’] revocation, and he has taken no meaningful action in response to this blatant act of discrimination.”

The August resolution sparked fierce debate on the Berkeley campus and in the pro-Israel advocacy world. He said nine officially recognized student groups “will not invite speakers who have expressed and continue to hold views or who are organizing/sponsoring/promoting events in support of Zionism, the apartheid state of Israel and the occupation of Palestine”. The organizations employ rhetoric commonly used by enemies of Israel, including supporters of the anti-Semitic Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, which is waging economic war against Israel.

At the heart of the complaint is the allegation that these groups target Jewish and pro-Israel students because of their religious identity or national origin. This “forced exclusion” of primarily Jewish students, the complaint states, “is unlawful and constitutes a flagrant violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act.”

“There can be no misunderstanding: anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism,” the complaint says.

“By effectively saying ‘Zionists are not welcome,’ these student groups – and by extension Berkeley, its inability to act – are excluding, marginalizing and silencing Jews, and helping to create an environment hostile to Jewish students, faculty, and staff, under circumstances [where] anti-Semitism, including on campuses, is already at record highs across the United States,” according to the complaint.

Groisman, the attorney handling the case with the International Legal Forum, told the Free tag that framing hatred of Jews in the language of anti-Zionism will not save Berkeley from being investigated for discrimination.

“Federal laws are in place to protect students from discriminatory actions,” he said. “UC Berkeley student groups have tried to be cute by hiding their discrimination against Jews by excluding Zionists. We are confident that the US Department of Education will see through them and protect students under the protections granted by Title VI.”

]]>
Jeremy Hunt to unveil spending cuts and tax hikes https://threebearsbandb.com/jeremy-hunt-to-unveil-spending-cuts-and-tax-hikes/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:49:09 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/jeremy-hunt-to-unveil-spending-cuts-and-tax-hikes/ Jeremy Hunt Chancellor Jeremy Hunt will pledge to weather the economic ‘storm’ as he is expected to confirm widespread spending cuts and tax hikes. He will say that “tough decisions” are needed to cope with soaring prices and limit mortgage costs. But he faces a potential backlash from some Tory MPs who oppose big tax […]]]>

Jeremy Hunt

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt will pledge to weather the economic ‘storm’ as he is expected to confirm widespread spending cuts and tax hikes.

He will say that “tough decisions” are needed to cope with soaring prices and limit mortgage costs.

But he faces a potential backlash from some Tory MPs who oppose big tax hikes.

The BBC understands that state pension and benefits will rise with prices. Energy support is expected to continue beyond April but will be less generous.

Labor said the country was ‘held back by 12 years of Conservative economic failure and squandered opportunities’, with workers ‘paying the price’.

The BBC has spoken to people in Whitehall and Parliament about what is likely to be in Mr Hunt’s autumn statement.

Final figures will be released as the statement is delivered, but it is expected that around 55% of the measures will be spending cuts and 45% tax hikes. This will likely equate to around £30bn in spending cuts and £24bn in tax hikes.

The Chancellor is likely to argue that this is not a return to the austerity policies of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government of 2010, with the balance of tax spending cuts rising from 80% to 20% under then Chancellor George Osborne.

The government argues the measures are needed to close a so-called fiscal black hole – the gap between what the government raises and spends.

However, some have questioned the reliability of the forecasts and the policy decisions taken by ministers.

Freezing the levels at which people pay various taxes will be a big theme of the statement. Due to inflation and wage increases, people will end up paying more taxes.

The threshold at which top earners start paying the top rate of tax will be lowered to £125,000 from £150,000.

With inflation – the rate at which prices are rising – currently at its highest level in 41 years, many departments will see their budgets tightened with increases below inflation.

But the health budget is expected to be protected and grow in real terms – even when price increases are taken into account.

Chart showing inflation hit 11.1% in October

Chart showing inflation hit 11.1% in October

The government will also save money by making energy bill coverage less generous from April.

The Treasury is likely to say that an energy price guarantee will remain in place – but will be set at a higher level. This means millions of households will see their bills rise by hundreds of pounds a year from April.

Under the current regime a household using a typical amount of gas and electricity would have to pay £2,500 a year. This figure is expected to rise to just over £3,000, but without the intervention the bill for a typical household would have reached £4,000.

Universal child support will end, but targeted support will be given to low-income people and retirees.

The energy industry – including energy producers – will also be hit by a significantly expanded windfall tax to help pay for support.

The BBC understands the state pension and benefits will rise with inflation – although this has not been officially confirmed.

A raise National Living Wagefrom the current level of £9.50 an hour for over-23s, will also be confirmed.

After unexpected announcements in the ill-fated mini budget of Mr Hunt’s predecessor, Kwasi Kwarteng, no major surprises are expected from the Chancellor.

Mr. Hunt has already reversed nearly all of the tax hikes announced in the mini-budget in a bid to stabilize financial markets.

Unlike Mr. Kwarteng, Mr. Hunt will release independent forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) alongside his statement.

Forecasts should paint a gloomy picture, after the Bank of England warned that the country is on the verge of its longest recession since records began.

In his autumn statement, Mr Hunt is expected to say: “We are making tough decisions to ensure strong public finances and help keep mortgage rates low, but our plan also protects our long-term economic growth.

“At the same time, we are protecting the vulnerable, because to be British is to be compassionate.”

He is about to add that the UK is not “immune” to the global economic crisis “but with this plan for stability, growth and public services – we are going to weather the storm”.

However, some right-wing Tory MPs in the party have already expressed concern over the prospect of tax hikes.

Former cabinet minister Esther McVey said Raising taxes is the “last thing” a Conservative government should do.

On Wednesday, she warned she would not support tax hikes unless HS2’s “unnecessary vanity project” was scrapped.

Simon Clarke, who was in Ms Truss’ cabinet, warned Mr Hunt not to ‘throw the baby out with the bathwater and over-correct’ by imposing too many tax hikes.

“I hope they find a balance that relies much more on spending cuts than tax hikes to balance the books,” he told BBC Radio 4’s PM program.

But former work and pensions secretary Stephen Crabb said he feared the spending cuts posed “real risks to the quality of public services”.

He told the BBC that the state pension and benefits must ‘absolutely’ rise with inflation and that the guarantee of energy prices must be broader than just helping pensioners and benefit recipients .

He added he was confident Mr Hunt would make “the right decisions”.

Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves said the UK needed “fairer choices for workers and a proper plan for growth”.

“Britain has so much potential, but we are falling behind on the world stage, while the costs of mortgages, food and energy rise more and more,” she said.

]]>
Investing in any political outcome can be dangerous https://threebearsbandb.com/investing-in-any-political-outcome-can-be-dangerous/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 15:20:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/investing-in-any-political-outcome-can-be-dangerous/ wildpixel/iStock via Getty Images Your policy can be dangerous for your performance In our modern world, keeping up to date with work and family issues is a full-time occupation. Most of us are not prepared nor do we have the skill to analyze complex economic problems. We must rely on reliable sources. Generally, we turn […]]]>

wildpixel/iStock via Getty Images

Your policy can be dangerous for your performance

In our modern world, keeping up to date with work and family issues is a full-time occupation. Most of us are not prepared nor do we have the skill to analyze complex economic problems. We must rely on reliable sources. Generally, we turn to sources that present a point of view most closely associated with our own. These views, whether conservative or liberal, may be influenced by political narratives rather than factual analysis. Being roped into these stories can blur a true reading of the facts on the ground. For example, I know people who sold stocks when Barack Obama was re-elected in 2012. I also know people who blew up their stocks when Donald Trump was elected in 2016. Both were the wrong decisions to take at the time.

What I mean is, we’re all wrapped up in these political/emotional narratives, and it can make us do stupid things with our money.

Many political demands seem to make sense but do not hold water

Two of the most important assertions about the economy concerned the inflation that erupted after the pandemic and the administration’s apparent inability to do anything about it. BTW, neither side had concrete answers on how to bring it under control, but the onus was on the administration. The second problem, related to the first, has been called the failure of energy policy.

Let’s talk about inflation

The root causes of our current inflation problem have much more to do with the pandemic-related fiscal mega-stimulus and tax cuts (all on the credit card), $7 trillion, much of which had bipartisan support. We could also add, for good measure, a monetary policy that was too easy, too long in response to the 2008/2009 financial crisis and the pandemic. Then there was the pent-up demand caused by the lockdowns and finally the disruption of the supply chain related to the lockdown. Oh yeah, a lot of people left the workforce during the pandemic and never came back. Add to that a very restrictive immigration policy and you have wage inflation the likes of which we haven’t seen since the onset of the disinflationary impact of globalization on wages and prices… somewhat to blame for the plight of the middle class in the United States. The unemployment rate stands at 3.6% and it has been one of the best times in history to look for a job in our country.

How can we reverse this…a massive tax hike (fiscal policy), massive federal spending cuts (what’s your choice?), or raise interest rates through the roof (i.e. all are very unlikely. I might point out that none of these solutions are the direct purview of the executive – usually the central point of blame. I might also point out that the benefits of globalization are reversing. Shipping all those jobs to the alien is now coming back to bite us where it hurts. We have created huge middle classes overseas, and they all want to live like you and me. This means huge competition and demand for resources that we don’t have faced over the past two decades. The prices of all kinds of commodities will rise on a secular basis, and we cannot control that.

Unless President Biden or his Republican counterparts have a magic wand, our only hope is that the Fed’s recent efforts to rein in the beast, along with greater productivity in the post-Covid world, will lead to moderation. of inflation.

Let’s look at the subset of our inflation problems… Energy Policy

Let me suggest that the administration’s energy policies, deep-sixing of the Keystone-XL pipeline, and bans on allowing new drilling on federal lands have little to do with the current high energy prices. On the other hand, the promotion of green energy and electric vehicles may have dampened chilled energy companies’ plans to “drill the babies”. Businesses have looked to the future and seen highways crowded with electric vehicles, perhaps making them more circumspect about how they invest and plan for their own future. As a result, they invest less in new production, hoard cash, pay down debt, and return cash to shareholders through share buybacks and dividend increases. It is the soul of enlightened self-interest. All this evasion about the need to open leases on federal lands is false. APA Corp. (PAA), a personal holding of mine, has a ten-year inventory of drillable prospects. They and other oil companies are thrilled the administration is taking the push for anything they could do to remedy the situation.

Then there’s OPEC, which operates with the same concerns about the long-term viability of its energy assets. If we in the United States decide to dramatically increase production, OPEC’s normal reaction will be to flood the market and cause prices to explode. We seem to be living in a new world where producers are more interested in maximizing their profits rather than rushing to increase production to meet growing demand. My feeling is that the only way Congress (and it would probably take an act of Congress) could have any impact on production would be to guarantee the producer a profit on the dollars spent to produce more oil (i.e. say subsidies like those for agriculture). I doubt it would fly.

Market reaction to election results

As the November 8 election approached, there seemed to be consensus that we were going to see a big red wave. People were fed up with the economy (which was quite strong) and, more importantly, with inflation. There seemed to be an idea that the reds would take care of inflation because they were much better than the blues at Econ 101. I don’t know why this concept exists because I’ve seen some really good economies led by the blues (Clinton 1 & 2 and Obama 1 & 2). I also heard over election day lunch that a red win would be great for energy stocks. I wasn’t sure about that statement either, as stocks had been great sources of income and great results.

As this red wave failed to materialize, the market collapsed and the energy sector was hit hard, with the Energy Select Sector SPDR fund (XLE) down nearly 5% and West Texas Intermediate down more than $3.00 a barrel. I guess that answer was consistent with the idea that a more favorable legislative mix was disappearing. In the final analysis, none of this makes sense.

My simplistic analysis – restricting production, which the energy industry agrees, keeps prices and profits higher than encouraging production. So why the rout? My feeling is that partisan rhetoric has taken precedence over actual facts and reasoning. Crude’s sharp drop was also a complete mystery until the release of the American Petroleum Institute’s (API) weekly inventory report showed crude inventories higher than industry experts had expected. estimated… noise. On Friday (11/11), the XLE hit a new 52-week high.

What I mean is that pre-election and post-election political language is not a good way to invest. Besides, investing in any political outcome is dangerous because it can be done on the basis of passions rather than reason. On the other hand, these events create opportunities. It did, with Thursday’s better than expected CPI print. Did you leave your policy at the door?

What do you think?

Original post

]]>
La Vista voters reject restaurant tax hike https://threebearsbandb.com/la-vista-voters-reject-restaurant-tax-hike/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/la-vista-voters-reject-restaurant-tax-hike/ By a 2-to-1 margin, La Vista voters rejected a 1% tax increase for local bars and restaurants in the general election ballot. The proposal would have increased the City’s restaurant and drinking place occupancy tax from 1.5% to 2.5% of gross receipts from the sale of food and beverages. The measure was rejected 3,383 to […]]]>

By a 2-to-1 margin, La Vista voters rejected a 1% tax increase for local bars and restaurants in the general election ballot.

The proposal would have increased the City’s restaurant and drinking place occupancy tax from 1.5% to 2.5% of gross receipts from the sale of food and beverages. The measure was rejected 3,383 to 1,644, according to unofficial results.

“It wasn’t unexpected, except maybe the margin of the vote,” Mayor Douglas Kindig said. “You know, it’s a difficult time. We knew that when we offered it.

Kindig said the city has done everything possible to inform the public about the measure, with information being disseminated by mail and online. A group of citizens, including members of the Kindig and La Vista city council, used private funds to advocate for the increase.

The planned $700,000 in additional funds raised was allocated to city operations, including new staff to meet growing demands for services. Kindig said directors would review the impact on La Vista’s budget to determine plans.

People also read…

Voters approved a second ballot measure, which maintains the city’s half-cent sales tax to fund street improvements. The tax has been in place since 1990, but was due to expire in 2025. The sales tax is extended for 30 years.

“I think that was exactly what the citizens wanted. They sent a very clear message. said Kindig. “That’s who we serve.”

]]>
Airstrikes in Syria hit fuel convoy from Iraq; Iranians killed https://threebearsbandb.com/airstrikes-in-syria-hit-fuel-convoy-from-iraq-iranians-killed/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 07:04:07 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/airstrikes-in-syria-hit-fuel-convoy-from-iraq-iranians-killed/ World leaders discuss ways to help developing countries avoid climate catastrophe on day two of COP27 SHARM EL-SHEIKH: African and Caribbean leaders demanded more funding and technical support from wealthier countries in the fight against global warming in a series of speeches at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Egypt, or COP27. Speaking at […]]]>

World leaders discuss ways to help developing countries avoid climate catastrophe on day two of COP27

SHARM EL-SHEIKH: African and Caribbean leaders demanded more funding and technical support from wealthier countries in the fight against global warming in a series of speeches at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Egypt, or COP27.

Speaking at COP27 in the Red Sea city of Sharm el-Sheikh, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said the entire African continent was now experiencing the effects of climate change.

Ramaphosa said Africa should build its adaptive capacity, but also urged multilateral cooperation to achieve sustainability goals.

“Multilateral support is out of reach for the majority of the world’s population due to lending policies and conditionality. We need a clear roadmap to deliver on Glasgow’s decision to double adaptation funding by 2025,” said Ramaphosa, referring to last year’s COP26 summit in Scotland.

At the opening of this year’s conference, participating nations agreed to include the issue of ‘loss and damage’ on the main agenda for the first time ever.

Acknowledging loss and damage would cause cash-rich polluters to pay reparations to poorer states that contribute negligibly to emissions but still face unavoidable climate change damage due to worsening flooding. , droughts and sea level rise.

Speaking to Arab News on the sidelines of the summit, Adel Al-Jubeir, the Saudi envoy for climate affairs, stressed that the response to climate change must be based on science, not emotion.

Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley has called for a 10% tax on oil companies to fund loss and damage. (AFP)

“Saudi Arabia has always maintained that discussions about climate change should be based on logic and science, rather than emotion, because we believe there are solutions to these challenges. If we put our minds together, let’s gather our resources and put them to work, I would say that Saudi Arabia’s actions speak for themselves.

Addressing the issue of renewable energy, Al-Jubeir said the Kingdom’s commitment to becoming the world’s largest exporter of green hydrogen demonstrates its commitment to environmental well-being.

“We plan to be the largest exporter of green hydrogen in the world. We want to ensure that we are not only contributing, but effectively contributing to meeting the challenges of global change,” he said.

He added that the launch of the Saudi Green and Middle East Green initiatives are necessary steps taken to support action against climate change.

“Saudi Arabia has taken the lead in mobilizing the region through its Middle East Green Initiative, which is the world’s most ambitious project to combat desertification and plant trees and shrubs to reduce carbon and increase oxygen production”.

Al-Jubeir also said that the Kingdom has launched more than 60 initiatives to address environmental challenges, such as turning waste into energy, greening cities and protecting and preserving 30% of the country’s land for the natural habitat.

Speaking at the inauguration of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East Climate Change Initiative, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi said policies to combat global warming must be coordinated with organizations non-governmental.

He said the scientific community played a key role in the initiative, which set it apart from other organisations.

“Despite the primary responsibility of states and governments in this regard, other non-governmental parties should play complementary and supporting roles according to their responsibility and work towards the principles of cooperation and participation,” said El- Sisi.

“What distinguishes the initiative (for) which we meet today from other initiatives and efforts is the science component it encompasses, which is indispensable if we seek to align our efforts on climate change with the best science available. .”

El-Sisi said the region has experienced serious climatic events in recent years, ranging from forest fires to floods and torrential rains, which have resulted in many human and financial losses.

“We have confidence in countries that can undertake this initiative as part of the coordination of policies aimed at climate change,” he said.

“It is a region which, as you know, is one of the regions in the world most affected by the consequences of climate change and its devastating effects at all levels,” he added.

African and Caribbean leaders have nonetheless argued that their countries need urgent financial assistance to tackle climate challenges.

In his speech at COP27, Evariste Ndayishimiye, President of Burundi, said it was vital that African nations received sufficient funding to help accelerate the energy transition.

“Burundi calls on the UN and international financial institutions to create innovative financial mechanisms. These mechanisms should contain green bonds and large-scale financial guarantees,” he said.

Ghanaian President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo has called for a “radical restructuring of the global financial architecture”.

He added, “No one will win if Africa loses.”

Meanwhile, Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, told delegates that reparations would help the world meet its climate goals.

“Loss and damage should not be viewed through controversial lenses; it should be seen as a decarbonization accelerator,” he said.

“We need to establish a loss and damage response fund here. Adoption of the agenda item is only one step. We look forward to having funds in place by 2024.”

He also added that humanity needs collective action to reduce harmful emissions and criticized fossil fuel companies.

Browne, speaking on behalf of the 39-nation Alliance of Small Island States, also called for a windfall tax on oil companies to compensate developing countries for damage caused by climate change-induced natural disasters.

“It’s time these companies were forced to pay a global COP carbon tax on these profits as a source of loss and damage funding,” Browne said.

“While they’re enjoying it, the planet is burning.”

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said the entire African continent is now experiencing the effects of climate change. (AFP)

On Monday, Mia Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, called for a 10% tax on oil companies to finance losses and damages.

At Tuesday’s meeting of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East Climate Change Initiative, Abdul Latif Rashid, President of Iraq, said now is the time for climate action.

“I think we have enough information, knowledge (and) technology to solve these problems,” he said, stressing the need for all countries to support an implementation plan and provide solutions.

“It will take time to put in place and secure the necessary funding. There are direct and indirect factors affecting climate, such as population increase, which directly affect climate change,” Rashid said.

“We need to get new systems with new technologies…to limit water waste in the future,” he added.

Nicos Kouyialis, the Cypriot agriculture minister, said the Middle East region has been classified by the scientific community as a global climate change hotspot, adding that coordinated action is needed.

“Action based on sound science is needed to address climate change issues in the Middle East region,” he said.

Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades agreed, adding: “I have no doubt that we will act urgently, collaborate and coordinate, to ensure a better environment for the future.”

Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the Greek prime minister, said energy security remained a major concern. “We discussed with Abdel Fattah El-Sissi energy projects to ensure more efficient energy transfer, not only for use in the region, but for export to the European market,” Mitsotakis said.

Meanwhile, Bisher Al-Khasawneh, Prime Minister of Jordan, highlighted the impacts on the environment, food and people due to climate change.

“They are increasing every day and predicting disaster in the future,” he said. “That’s why we need to launch an initiative to deal with these consequences of climate change.

“Jordan is committed to respecting and taking all measures for comprehensive solutions and ensuring green growth while implementing our national ambitions.”

]]>
Meet the Candidate: Braxton Mitchell, Republican for HD-3 https://threebearsbandb.com/meet-the-candidate-braxton-mitchell-republican-for-hd-3/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 07:04:07 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/meet-the-candidate-braxton-mitchell-republican-for-hd-3/ Braxton-Mitchell To party: Republican Age: 22 Occupation: Highland Site Services & Vandevanter Family Businesses Meats & MT Jerky Company Community Involvement: You can still catch me at community functions all over Flathead County. What are the main issues you would like to see addressed in the next legislative session? Residents of House District 3 have […]]]>


Braxton-Mitchell

To party: Republican

Age: 22

Occupation: Highland Site Services & Vandevanter Family Businesses Meats & MT Jerky Company

Community Involvement: You can still catch me at community functions all over Flathead County.

What are the main issues you would like to see addressed in the next legislative session?

Residents of House District 3 have very clear priorities that will improve their lives locally and nationally.

First, they want their $1.8 billion in overtaxed last year. That is why I will vote against all appropriation bills until taxpayers’ money is returned.

Second, our elders are ignored. It is essential that we provide immediate and permanent tax relief. I will work with Rep. Paul Fielder, R-Thompson Falls to eliminate Social Security income tax in Montana. We’re one of 12 states that mandate Social Security, and right now with Biden-flation, it’s time we worked to ease that burden on Montana’s seniors. We passed the bill last session in the House with every Democrat in the state opposing it, but it ended up failing in the appropriations. We plan to work on it during this session.

Third, the Governor has outlined a plan to solve Montana’s housing crisis, I look forward to working with lawmakers and the executive branch to find the best solution to solving Montana’s housing crisis.

Why are you the best choice to represent your district?

My district is a conservative district, so it deserves a conservative voice to represent them and their interests in Helena.

We need proven leadership from Montana. Having a legislative voting record shows that I don’t just have rhetoric – I’ve shown that I deliver on the promises I made when I was elected. Although the Legislature only meets for 90 days every two years, a Representative’s work does not stop. Voters ask questions and requests almost every day. Not only do I work to find solutions, but I work to build lasting relationships with residents and business owners.

During my first term it has been an honor and a privilege to earn the trust of those I represent and one of the ways I have done this is by actively involving people in THEIR government.

]]>
Q&A: Get to know the candidates for US House District 14 https://threebearsbandb.com/qa-get-to-know-the-candidates-for-us-house-district-14/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 14:28:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/qa-get-to-know-the-candidates-for-us-house-district-14/ What needs to be done to improve transportation in the Greater Houston Area? As a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, where I work closely with my colleagues, the military and the US Army Corps of Engineers to determine how to best protect and improve our country’s infrastructure. We must simplify the cumbersome permitting […]]]>

What needs to be done to improve transportation in the Greater Houston Area?

As a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, where I work closely with my colleagues, the military and the US Army Corps of Engineers to determine how to best protect and improve our country’s infrastructure. We must simplify the cumbersome permitting process to ensure the efficient and timely completion of critical infrastructure projects in the Greater Houston Area, which will create jobs, boost energy production and promote economic growth.

What should be done to mitigate flooding in the Greater Houston Area?

I believe the Texas Coastal Spine is a step in the right direction. The Gulf Coast of Texas is home to millions of people, countless homes and jobs, and many refineries and this project will reduce the impact of hurricanes and tropical storms. I’ve been pushing for this critical project in Congress for years, and this year we received approval to seek federal funding for the project.

If elected, what would be your priorities?

I will continue to push for funding to protect the coastal barrier, secure our schools, pass my three bills to strengthen schools, bring production back to the United States, and unleash American energy. Additionally, we need to keep Americans safe by closing our border, getting fentanyl and other drugs off the streets, also defunding the police, and ending the growing crime problems in our cities.

What makes you the best candidate for the job?

My wife and I have called the Texas Gulf Coast our entire lives. I know what issues are important to families in this district because we have been part of these communities all our lives. First at Texas House and now in Congress, I work long days in DC and here at home to STAND UP for our people, our principles and our future. I am Texan, Christian and conservative.

What needs to be done to improve transportation in the Greater Houston Area?

Investing in infrastructure and expanding public transportation throughout the Greater Houston area and surrounding counties to include rail systems, partnerships with local municipalities, universities and colleges, to expand bus systems public services in relation to the current metro transport system, and the expanded creation of high-occupancy vehicle and express access to HCTRA and TxTag tracks.

What should be done to mitigate flooding in the Greater Houston Area?

We should invest in bold flood mitigation projects throughout the district and we should fund and expand the Congress-approved Coastal Backbone Project. Hurricane Ike hit September 1, 2008 and there have been at least five destructive weather events since then and nothing has been done by our current representative to protect our coastal properties and our way of life. We can include hydrodynamics to harness the renewable energy of moving water to help…

If elected, what would be your priorities?

As your representative for Congressional District 14, I would prioritize the flood mitigation projects mentioned above for our district. I would prioritize criminal justice reform and the issues of funding flood mitigation infrastructure and public education by doing the above and decriminalizing marijuana nationwide and working with the state officials to legalize and tax adult consumption. I would also prioritize the protection of our constitutional rights to life. freedom and the pursuit of happiness by fighting for our voting rights, our reproductive privacy rights, and our gun safety rights.

What makes you the best candidate for the job?

I’m not a lifelong politician just interested in staying in power and getting rich. I am an average American who loves his country, has dedicated his life to servant leadership throughout my educational journey in law school. and my professional experience working for the State of Texas, opening a law firm, and building a workforce training institute from the ground up. I know what hard work is, how to handle it.

]]>
Senior Mayor: Mark Lacis https://threebearsbandb.com/senior-mayor-mark-lacis/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 14:16:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/senior-mayor-mark-lacis/ October 16—Name: Mark Lacis Website: www.marklacis.com Age: 43 years old Family: (My wife is) Chris Lacis, (and my) twins (are) Dylan and Jackson Lacis. How long have you lived in Superior? Eight years Professional background: Lawyer Political/community experience: Interim Mayor from 2018 to present; Member of the Senior Board of Directors from 2016 to present; […]]]>

October 16—Name: Mark Lacis

Website: www.marklacis.com

Age: 43 years old

Family: (My wife is) Chris Lacis, (and my) twins (are) Dylan and Jackson Lacis.

How long have you lived in Superior? Eight years

Professional background: Lawyer

Political/community experience: Interim Mayor from 2018 to present; Member of the Senior Board of Directors from 2016 to present; and High Commissioner for Urbanism from 2014 to 2016.

Education: Graduated from Seton Hall University School of Law with a Juris Doctor degree in 2005 and graduated from Rutgers College in 2001 with a Bachelor of Arts.

The lawsuit over the planned $280 million Coal Creek Innovation Campus project has been in the news recently. What is your position on the project and what can the council do to maintain residents’ confidence for future development projects?

I voted no on the Life Sciences proposal because I did not believe it matched the vision for downtown Superior that was sold to this community years ago. Superior was promised a bustling, pedestrianized Main Street. A corporate campus at the entrance to downtown is uninviting and seems like a missed opportunity to do something special and big.

What attracts you to public service at Superior?

My wife and I feel blessed to be able to live and raise our boys in Superior. I strongly believe in public service, which is deeply rooted in my family. My grandfather was mayor of a small town in Estonia in the 1940s when the Soviets invaded the Baltic during World War II. He has been described as a stoic but kind leader who took decisive action and led many in his community to safety during the occupation. I hope to follow in my grandfather’s footsteps and become the next mayor of Superior. I hope to make grandfather proud and superior proud.

If elected mayor, what can the board do to support businesses in Superior who have suffered lost revenue due to the pandemic, the Marshall fire and the current economic downturn, in addition to the hardships to retain a workforce, loss of customers displaced by the fire, and cited a lack of affordable housing options to retain local employees?

Throughout the pandemic, we have supported Superior residents and businesses in several ways: by raising federal funds (American Rescue Plan Act) in direct grants to small businesses, by sending residents “superior money” , which could only be spent in our local businesses. , continuing to fund the Superior Chamber of Commerce, hiring an economic development manager, and providing incentives for new and existing businesses to enter into leases in Superior. We also passed an affordable housing ordinance that requires 15% of new housing projects to be permanently affordable. In the wake of the Marshall fire, we waived building permit fees for rebuilds, reduced use taxes, and allowed fire victims to build to 2018 building codes, making the more economical reconstruction for fire victims. We’ve also relaxed secondary suite restrictions and provided more flexibility for Original Town and Sagamore residents regarding building heights, setbacks and model requirements. All of these changes should make it easier and cheaper for residents to rebuild and recover from the fire. Going forward, we need to keep our property taxes low and ensure our sales tax rates remain competitive.

]]>
2022 Patch Candidate Profiles: Marek Kozikowski, 14th House District https://threebearsbandb.com/2022-patch-candidate-profiles-marek-kozikowski-14th-house-district/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 02:16:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/2022-patch-candidate-profiles-marek-kozikowski-14th-house-district/ SOUTH WINDSOR, CT – The 2022 election is heating up in Connecticut and there are plenty of races with candidates eager to run for elected office. Eyes are mostly on the gubernatorial election, but every state representative and Senate seat is up for grabs. Connecticut’s five congressional seats, plus a U.S. Senate seat, are also […]]]>

SOUTH WINDSOR, CT – The 2022 election is heating up in Connecticut and there are plenty of races with candidates eager to run for elected office. Eyes are mostly on the gubernatorial election, but every state representative and Senate seat is up for grabs. Connecticut’s five congressional seats, plus a U.S. Senate seat, are also up for grabs.

There are 151 seats in the State House of Representatives and 36 in the State Senate. Democrats currently hold a majority in both chambers.

Connecticut Patch has asked candidates to answer questions about their campaigns and will post candidate profiles closer to Election Day.

Find out what’s happening in South Windsorwith free real-time Patch updates.

South Windsor resident Marek Kozikowski is running for Connecticut General Assembly in the 14th District.

Campaign website

Find out what’s happening in South Windsorwith free real-time Patch updates.

https://MarekKozikowski.com

Party Affiliation

united community

Education

Master of Public Administration (MPA), UConn; MA in Economics, UConn; BA in Economics and Geography, UConn.

Occupation

town planner; 17 years.

Family

Married with 4 children: 12, 10, 9 and 6 years old.

Does anyone in your family work in politics or government?

Nope

Age

39

Previous civil service, nominative or elective

South Windsor City Council (2021–present)
South Windsor School Board (2019-2021)
Windsor South IWA/CC (2018-2019)

Why are you looking for this office?

I am running for this office because I am dedicated to serving my community in the greatest capacity available to me. As a state representative, I can leverage my work experience in government to better serve my community in South Windsor.

Please complete this statement: The most pressing issue facing my constituents is ___, and here is what I intend to do about it.

the state government is enacting uniform laws for housing development in all cities, and I will fight for South Windsor to maintain local control over its future growth and development.

What are the main differences between you and the other candidates for this position?

I bring nearly two decades of professional experience in the field of planning and economic development. I have countless experiences solving problems for residents and business owners through my position as a public servant.

If you are challenging an incumbent, how has the current incumbent let the community down?

The incumbent has been in this role for several years now, and it’s time to bring a fresh perspective and new skills to the office.

What other issues do you intend to address during your campaign?

We are in unprecedented times where there are so many federal and state grant opportunities available, and South Windsor is not taking advantage of them. As a state representative, I will work to open grant opportunities and seek funding for projects in South Windsor that will improve the quality of life and reduce the tax burden for residents.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as proof that you can handle this job?

I have written and advocated for zoning changes to facilitate major economic development projects and transit-oriented development in various communities. I served as an urban planner.

I facilitated the purchase of over 200 acres of open space and farmland in Middletown as a town planner.

I wrote zoning regulations and ordinances to help small businesses.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

There is always more work to do.

Is there anything else you would like voters to know about you and your duties?

I am dedicated to my family, my career and my community. All I do is improve each of them a little bit.


Get more local news straight to your inbox. Sign up for free newsletters and patch alerts.

]]>
Candidates for the 35th District House, post 1 https://threebearsbandb.com/candidates-for-the-35th-district-house-post-1/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 22:18:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/candidates-for-the-35th-district-house-post-1/ Rep. Dan Griffey, a Republican from Allyn who held the 35th District, Position 1 seat for four terms, is seeking a fifth term in the Nov. 8 election. He is challenged by Democrat James DeHart, a Mason County government employee. The Kitsap Sun asked contestants to answer seven questions. Their responses follow: James DeHart Age: […]]]>

Rep. Dan Griffey, a Republican from Allyn who held the 35th District, Position 1 seat for four terms, is seeking a fifth term in the Nov. 8 election. He is challenged by Democrat James DeHart, a Mason County government employee.

The Kitsap Sun asked contestants to answer seven questions. Their responses follow:

James DeHart

Age: 40

Actual job: Public Records Officer for Mason County Commissioners Office

Previous experience as an elected official: First time candidate

To party: Democratic

Campaign Contributions: $16,707.02

Q: Inflation is a challenge for many. What should the Legislative Assembly do to help those struggling with rising gas and food prices?

A: The legislator should consider a temporary suspension of the gasoline tax and possibly a lowering of the sales tax rate as a means of offsetting the effects of inflation.

Q: The police reform legislation has raised the barrier preventing law enforcement agencies from engaging in car chases against people suspected of a crime. Do you support the law as is or do you think it should be changed?

]]>