Occupation Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 02:22:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://threebearsbandb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Occupation Tax – Three Bears Band B http://threebearsbandb.com/ 32 32 What you need to know about the tax implications of principal residence https://threebearsbandb.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-tax-implications-of-principal-residence/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 04:11:08 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-tax-implications-of-principal-residence/ With so many South Africans working from home these days, it is tempting to claim home office space against business income when it comes to tax deductions. READ ALSO : Fanyana is ready to serve and take care of the finances of the city But few people realize that it can affect capital gains tax […]]]>

With so many South Africans working from home these days, it is tempting to claim home office space against business income when it comes to tax deductions.

READ ALSO : Fanyana is ready to serve and take care of the finances of the city

But few people realize that it can affect capital gains tax when they sell the house.

Just Property’s Sohail Govender outlines what you need to know if you sold your primary residence between March 1, 2021 and February 28, 2022.

To be considered a principal residence, your home must meet the basic requirements under SARS regulations:

• It must be a structure used as a place of residence by an individual.

• An individual or special trust must hold an interest in the residence.

• The individual having an interest in the residence, beneficiary of the trust, spouse of this person or beneficiary must usually reside in the house and use it mainly for domestic purposes as their habitual residence.

Believe it or not, a yacht, caravan or mobile home can be a principal residence if it is where the owners usually reside and it is used for domestic purposes.

If you own and live on a yacht and it is sold, you qualify for the principal residence exclusion.

What is the principal residence exclusion?

When taxpayers sell the house they live in daily, the first R2m of capital gain (or loss) is excluded when calculating capital gains tax.

The remainder of the capital gain will be subject to capital gains tax.

READ ALSO : Here’s why women need to control their finances

The principal residence exclusion also applies to the land on which the principal residence is located, including adjacent unconsolidated land if the following conditions are met:

• The exclusion only applies to a maximum of two hectares.

• The land must be used mainly for domestic or private purposes with the residence.

•The residence must be alienated at the same time and to the same person as the land on which it is located.

All individual taxpayers receive an additional capital gains exclusion of R40,000 per annum.

How do you calculate your capital gains tax?

To calculate your net capital gain or loss, of which the first R2m can be excluded, take the proceeds (the amount for which you sold the property) and subtract the cost base (the original cost price paid for the property plus the improvements). If the property was purchased before October 1, 2001, check the relevant rules.

Assume that Mr A has sold his principal residence for R3 million, which he originally purchased for R1.4 million on October 1, 2001.

In 2008, he installed a swimming pool at a cost of R100,000. Its base cost is R1.4m plus R100,000, which totals R1.5m.

Subtracting the base cost of R1.5 million from the proceeds of R3 million, Mr. A’s capital gain is R1.5 million.

This falls under the exclusion (limited to the first R2m) and its capital gain/loss is nil.

READ ALSO : Isuzu’s special financing offers on new vehicles

For assets that were acquired before October 1, 2001, the cost base is equal to the “measurement date value” of the asset, plus any other eligible costs incurred on or after that date.

How to calculate CGT when properties are in a condominium/marriage
If a principal residence is owned in a common domain / owned by spouses married in community of property, each spouse is treated as having equal shares.

For example, if a common estate sold a principal residence for R4m with a base cost of R2m, the capital gain is R2m.

Each spouse will have a capital gain of R1m, less the principal residence exclusion up to R1m each, meaning the gain included in taxable income will be nil for each party.

Declare home office expenses

If you work from home, claiming home office expenses on your tax return sounds like a great idea.

Think twice, as it could affect your capital gains tax when you’re ready to sell.

As Nicci Courtney-Clarke pointed out in her article for The South African Institution of Taxation:

“If the taxpayer worked from home and used part of the house as an office, the Income Tax Act requires that the capital gain be allocated between the use of the principal residence and the use of the business .

“This allocation should consider how long the home office has been used as part of the entire ownership period, as well as the size of the home office relative to the size of the entire property.”

Courtney-Clarke gives the example of a 100 m2 house bought for 1.2 million rand in February 2007.

A 10m2 home office was added in February 2015 at a cost of R300,000.

READ ALSO : The 5 Best Auto Finance Options Explained

Remember that the distribution is a percentage calculated according to the square meter of the part used for commercial purposes on a part of the whole house.

From 2015, the owner claimed 10% of the running costs of her house as a deduction from her taxable business income until February 2019, when she sold her house for R3.5 million.

His taxable income in 2019 was R500,000. The proceeds from the sale were R3.5 million. Its base cost was the initial purchase price of R1.2 million plus home office renovations of R300,000, which totals R1.5 million.

Capital gains plus proceeds of R3.5 million and cost base of R1.5 million total R2 million.

Part of the capital gains attributable to the use of the property as a home office (10% for four years out of 12 years): R2m × 4/12 × 10% = R66,666.

Part of the capital gains attributable to the use of the property as a principal residence: R2m minus R66,666 = R1,933,334.

Minus main residence exclusion: R1,933,334 – R2m = none. The total capital gains is R66,666. Minus the annual capital gains exclusion: R66,666 – R40,000 = R26,666.

“The capital gains inclusion rate is 40% for individuals. This means that 40% of the gains (R26,666 × 40% = R10,666) are added to the seller’s taxable income and will be taxed at their marginal tax rate,” Courtney-Clarke concluded.

Some interesting frequently asked questions:

• What if my primary residence was on a 99 year lease, but I have now sold that lease and made over R2.5m profit on the sale, will I still be able to apply exclusion?

Yes, the principal residence exclusion will apply, provided the individual has an interest in the residence. Interest means a real right and a right of use or occupation.

• What if the primary residence is in a Trust or Pty?

The principal residence exclusion will only apply if the property is owned by an individual or a special trust.

A Pty or corporation will not qualify as the corporation, being a separate legal entity, owns the property.

• We moved to our holiday home on Garden Route during the first lockdown. I spend the nights of the week in our house in Johannesburg and I return at the weekend.

My wife and children now live in the George house, but I spend most nights in the Johannesburg house. If we decided to sell the Johannesburg house, how would the capital gains be applied?

READ ALSO : The vehicle financing environment needs to become more flexible

The sale of the Johannesburg home would still benefit from the principal residence exclusion for CGT purposes.

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So you want to… organize garage sales on your farm? https://threebearsbandb.com/so-you-want-to-organize-garage-sales-on-your-farm/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:37:20 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/so-you-want-to-organize-garage-sales-on-your-farm/ Car boot sales can be a profitable diversification for farms in the right location, but it comes with multiple rules, regulations, and other considerations. Just as charity shops have populated the high streets of the UK in recent years, the garage sale has become a ubiquitous feature in the countryside. The British public can’t resist […]]]>

Car boot sales can be a profitable diversification for farms in the right location, but it comes with multiple rules, regulations, and other considerations.

Just as charity shops have populated the high streets of the UK in recent years, the garage sale has become a ubiquitous feature in the countryside.

The British public can’t resist a bargain and it’s been a key factor in the proliferation of farm field sales.

Michael Mack of The Rural Consultant says it can be a relatively simple business to set up, but it can’t be done halfway.

See also: Farmers warned to check tax implications of on-site events

“You need to do it well, maximize the number of merchants and capture additional costs, like a revenue share from hotel providers,” he says.

“If you provide a good customer experience, they will come back.”

Organizing a garage sale requires careful thought and planning, both to comply with legislation and to ensure that local communities are not affected by traffic jams and litter.

Do I need a building permit?

Under the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995, a landowner may use open land for a garage sale for up to 14 days without needing planning permission.

But the 14 days apply to each day that a field is used for other than agricultural purposes, so set-up and clean-up days need to be taken into account.

“The field must be completely cleared the day before and the day before a sale so that those days do not count. Even leaving items on the lot, like a portable toilet or shelter, could be construed as continued use,” Mack advises.

“It’s a good idea to keep evidence that this rule is followed because a local resident could very easily complain and this could result in a visit from an enforcement officer. Having a log or other proof of when a sale started and ended can help in this situation. »

If the 14-day threshold is exceeded, planning permission is required and this is also the case if permanent structures or new access walkways are created.

Should the event be licensed?

Even when sales last 14 days or less, the local authority must be notified that a market is taking place, as a business license is required.

Fees vary by council, with some charging an annual rate and others for each event.

The applicant must demonstrate that there is a strategy in place to control noise, litter and traffic.

Do I have to pay professional rates?

There is specific pricing advice regarding car boot sales, which should be checked with a local grading agent or tax advisor.

Is it better to outsource to a third party?

There are third-party car boot sales operators actively looking to lease land, says Simon Foster of Savills.

The advantage is that they assume the risk; in return, the farmer receives less income.

“There are some very good third-party operators out there, but there are also some that are less reputable,” says Foster.

“It’s your reputation at stake as a landowner, so you have to make sure you’re partnering with someone who’s going to do it well.”

If a third party is involved, make sure they have a plan in place for parking, staffing, and garbage collection.

traffic management

The setting up of garage sales is done most of the time very early in the day with some sellers arriving from 6am.

They also involve a lot of movement of people and cars, which can have a negative effect on the community.

“It’s important to be courteous and respectful of the local community,” says Mack.

“An operator needs to find a way to get cars off the road quickly so they line up on their lot and not on the main freeway.”

Site Suitability

Soil type is important – free-draining soil will mean fewer cancellations due to heavy rain or time spent towing vehicles off site if conditions deteriorate.

Separate entry and exit points will also be necessary unless a walkway is wide enough to allow cars to arrive and depart at the same time to avoid queues on the road and furious drivers who waiting in the field.

Some councils specify a minimum width of 4.5m for a walkway used for entry and exit.

Event staff

Marshals will be needed to direct traffic and manage on-site operations.

Make sure they are knowledgeable, can work efficiently, and are equipped with high visibility clothing.

“There can be conflicts on the pitch, so marshals need to be able to deal with situations like that,” Mack says.

Advertise the sale

Temporary traffic signs can be used, but there are specific planning laws regarding traffic signs, so check with the local authority what is permitted as they will be quick to detect police signs that break the rules.

“Charity events have certain exemptions for on-site advertising signs, but that won’t apply to a commercial event like a car boot sale,” says Mack.

He also recommends creating a business page on Facebook to promote the event.

Insurance

Insurers offer tailor-made cover for occasional sales, including civil liability.

Mr Foster recommends third party liability insurance worth at least £20million for such events.

“Unfortunately, there have been deaths and serious injuries and the claims made have been substantial,” he says.

He advises that a risk assessment of the site should take place.

“As a landowner, you have a duty of care: vis-à-vis the event organizer if you rent the site for sale or vis-à-vis the public if you operate it. If a third party is involved, you must provide them with a copy of this risk assessment.

Location fees

Visiting other garage sales in the locality is the best way to gauge the level of fees to set, as you will be competing with them.

Tax implications

To qualify for Inheritance Tax (IHT) and Agricultural Land Relief (APR), the land must have been owned and occupied for agricultural purposes for at least seven years when occupied by someone else, or at least two years when owner occupied.

The legislation refers to the purpose of the occupation being primarily ranching, so occasional use for a car boot sale does not necessarily prevent the land from qualifying, says accountant Martyn Dobinson, of Saffery Champness .

However, if the use is not primarily ranching, or if the land is permanently taken out of agriculture, it will not qualify.

“Each case should be considered on its own merits as the position may not be conclusive,” Mr Dobinson says.

In terms of VAT, there have been several successful challenges by HMRC where it was held that VAT should have been applied to the presentation fee.

Mr Dobinson advises organizers to have evidence to back up their position if they need to defend an HMRC investigation.

“The implications will also depend on whether the event organizer is subject to VAT and whether, for those who are not, the additional taxable income pushes the organizer above the threshold for VAT registration. £85,000 VAT,” he says.

Case study: Tripe Farm, Orpington, Kent

Hartley, Charles and Claretta George © The George Family

The George family have been running 14 garage sales a year at Tripes Farm, Orpington, Kent, since 1988, after selling their dairy herd to develop agricultural diversifications.

Their land is on the urban outskirts of the densely populated London Borough of Bromley and is easily accessible.

They opted to handle the sales themselves and for the past few years brother and sister Hartley and Claretta George have handled everything from maintenance to license applications.

The first sales attracted around 30 sellers, but now there can be up to 250.

Mr. George says the sales have a good reputation and that is important. “We always try to be well managed and a lot of people who come here tell us how well behaved the marshals are.”

The site also has a block of five sealed toilets which are kept clean and well maintained.

While some operators will try to save money by not cutting the grass, the Georges always mow their field before a sale, although commissioning a contractor is another cost.

It sits on chalky ground, so even if there is heavy rain during the week, it will have drained before the weekend sale.

An occasional sales license is required for each event. Bromley Council charges £278 but offers a discount if 14 licenses are purchased at once, bringing the annual cost down to £3,503.

With each application, a plan of the layout of the land must be provided, showing details such as waste disposal points, as well as designated areas for parking and an estimate of the number of people who may attend.

The regulations Georges must comply with under the London Local Authorities Act 1996 state that registration cards must be given to each vendor displaying these details on their location for customers to see.

Sellers must pay a scale of fees – £12 per car, £15 for small vans and £18 for anything larger than a standard van. There is a £1 surcharge for trailers.

As other carriers increase their rates this year due to rising costs, the Georges are also considering an increase.

“I’m afraid for a small fee it might put people off, but all our costs go up, for example diesel to mow the grass,” says Mr George.

There is no entry fee for shoppers – some operators will charge 50p to navigate, but this may entail parking on local verges and parking areas.

One of the negatives of running a sale is cleaning up the junk that’s left.

“We used to have a dumpster full of trash at the end of every sale, but now we’re getting tougher on people, and we have marshals watching over that,” he says.

“We still have to rent a dumpster, but much smaller, and we keep it out of sight and it’s usually only half full after each sale.”

The company also pays waste pickers. “If you graze a field with sheep afterwards, you don’t want waste on the site,” says George.

He says hosting sales is profitable, but not as profitable as before, due to increased staff, administration, waste disposal and advertising costs, although the advertising budget has been reduced relying on reputation and social media.

There’s also a lot more competition from online sites, George adds.

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Birbalsingh launches ambitious framework to map out steps to success https://threebearsbandb.com/birbalsingh-launches-ambitious-framework-to-map-out-steps-to-success/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:09:19 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/birbalsingh-launches-ambitious-framework-to-map-out-steps-to-success/ The Social Mobility Commission has developed a new index, which will monitor actual mobility for the first time by comparing a person’s situation at birth with their outcomes in their 30s and 50s. The index provides a richer, systematic and more consistent view of how people are progressing in school, work and financially relative to […]]]>

The Social Mobility Commission has developed a new index, which will monitor actual mobility for the first time by comparing a person’s situation at birth with their outcomes in their 30s and 50s. The index provides a richer, systematic and more consistent view of how people are progressing in school, work and financially relative to their parents and peers.

The State of the Nation 2022 – A New Approach to Social Mobility incorporates findings from the first phase and shows a mixed picture with both cause for celebration and cause for concern. There are, for example, clear signs that some gaps in educational attainment are closing between disadvantaged and advantaged children, particularly at key stages 2 and 4 (11 and 16). However, analysis of the 150-page report also shows that two-thirds of disadvantaged pupils and more than a third of all other pupils do not perform well in English and maths at GCSEs.

More measures will be added next year, including a regional breakdown and data on other characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and disability. This will allow the SMC to analyze the effects of personal characteristics and geographic location on where people end up in terms of the work they do and how much they earn – which is invaluable in helping to think about solutions early. policies.

Katharine Birbalsingh, president of the SMC, and her deputy, Alun Francis, want any future policy on social mobility to be firmly based on solid evidence. “We want to understand why social mobility happens, when it happens, and why some people go against the trend,” says Birbalsingh.

This is why we want to see government, both local and national, put social mobility at the heart of upgrading by using the results of our index to inform and assess success, and to ensure that their benefits benefit those who need it most. .

The Commission’s aim is consistency over time so that data can be compared annually – and at longer intervals of 5 or 10 years – to show trends in social mobility. The new measures have been carefully selected with input from experts in economics, sociology and education as well as other stakeholders from government, business and the charitable sector.

“The new Social Mobility Index draws on cutting-edge international research to provide a groundbreaking framework for tracking and understanding the changing mobility chances of young people,” said Anthony Heath, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Oxford, which helped develop the index. “It will provide early signs of hurdles that need to be overcome so that we can move towards a level playing field for all.”

So far, the focus has been more on factors that can help or hinder social mobility (called ‘drivers’ in the report), such as education and job opportunities for young people. Birbalsingh and Francis argue that there has been far less data on actual outcomes later in life, such as what occupation someone is in, where they live and what they earn in middle age. compared to his parents.

But they point out that there are also other important areas that impact social mobility that are less explored: talent diversity, family values ​​and culture. They’re difficult to measure, so they’re often not given enough weight, says Birbalsingh. “When we can, we want to find ways to measure them.”

Public opinion also counts for the Commission. “We plan to undertake research to better understand what real people really think about social mobility, so that we can ensure that the Commission’s work is aligned with their needs and desires,” says Birbalsingh.

The State of the Nation also sets out the main priorities on which the Commission intends to focus in the coming years. These include:

Education – covering early childhood, schools and universities, but also other pathways to employment such as continuing education and apprenticeship. SMC is also interested in learning more about how it can help families and parents.

Use – SMC will go beyond the city’s large professional businesses, many of which already have plans for a more diverse workforce, to look at how small businesses of all types can generate opportunity. It will also look at the impact that certain qualifications – notably diplomas and technical qualifications – can have on social mobility.

business and the economy – The Commission will examine the creation of opportunities, their geographical distribution and the role of business in sometimes difficult hierarchies of social mobility – all of which are at the heart of the government’s upgrading programme. It will focus on local neighborhoods where educational and economic opportunities are low across generations.

The Commission has made the new index one of its top priorities – to better inform policy advice. But he acknowledges that there are still many gaps in the data held by Whitehall and a lack of coordination between departments. He argues that without better data, policy advice often has to rely on elaborate guesswork.

“The government’s equality data program is a good start, but we believe there are areas where the government can go even further,” says Birbalsingh. “For example, in the UK the tax records of parents and children are not linked, as they are in other countries like the US, which makes measuring income mobility much more difficult. .” The SMC will present more specific recommendations for clearer and more consistent data in the near future.

Other report findings:

  • There are even more people who go up to a professional level higher than that of their parents than people who go down. But this surplus is less important than before. This is largely because the professional class has grown over the last 70 years, so there are more people already starting at the top, where no further progress is possible.
  • The relative chances of people from different occupational backgrounds getting into higher-level jobs have not gotten worse over the decades, and may even have gotten better.
  • The gap in school performance between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged 11-year-olds was around 13% smaller in 2019 than in 2011. We will have to watch how the impact of Covid-19 might affect this in the years to come. come.
  • However, significant gaps remain. In the 2020 to 2021 school year, only 31.7% of disadvantaged pupils achieved a grade of 5 or above in English and GCSE maths, compared to 59.2% of all other pupils. It also means that two-thirds of disadvantaged pupils and more than a third of all other pupils do not perform well in English and maths at GCSE.
  • The gaps between professional and popular backgrounds for both university participation and graduation have also narrowed between 2014 and 2021.
  • The rate of young people from working-class backgrounds without employment, education or training (NEET) has decreased since 2014 and was the lowest on record in 2021 at 12.4%. The gap between class backgrounds has also narrowed.
  • The gap between current occupational levels has also narrowed. In 2014, men aged 25 to 29 from a professional background were 1.9 times more likely to hold a professional job than men from a working class background. In 2021, this figure has dropped to 1.6 times more likely. For women, the decline was 2.3 times more likely to 1.6 times more likely.

Notes to Editors

What is the Social Mobility Index?

“Social mobility” refers to the connection between where we start in life and where we end up. The new index will be able to measure this in terms of occupation, income, education and other outcomes. We will be able to compare this across the UK by geographic regions, gender, ethnicity, disability.

  • Drivers – conditions that facilitate social mobility, such as the availability of good education and employment opportunities for young people. Drivers tell us about background conditions nationwide that can affect social mobility.
  • Outcomes early in life (intermediate) – the progress people make from their starting point in life to where they are in their twenties and thirties, such as employment, or educational attainment at age 16. This is broken down by socio-economic background of people.
  • Mobility results – progressing to a later stage in life, such as employment or income when people are in their 50s. We’ve only included a few illustrative measures of mobility outcomes this year, but we’ll add more in the future.

The new index builds on the Commission’s previous index which introduced the idea of ​​’cold’ and ‘hot’ spots of social mobility and, together with next year’s regional analysis, will give those working on social mobility even richer information to inform their work. At the time of publication, the Commission itself acknowledged that, by necessity, the old index was flawed and focused more on measures of disadvantage than on outcomes of social mobility.

About the Social Mobility Commission

The Social Mobility Commission is an independent, non-departmental public advisory body established under the Life Chances Act 2010, as amended by the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016. It has a duty to assess progress in the improving social mobility in the UK and promoting social mobility. In England.

The office of the Commission includes:

Katharine Birbalsingh CBE is Chair of the Social Mobility Commission and Principal and Co-Founder of Michaela Community School in Wembley, London.

Alun Francis OBE has been Deputy Chairman of the Social Mobility Commission and Principal and Chief Executive of Oldham College since 2010.

Both the President and Vice President will be available for radio and radio interviews.

Contact

Jill Sherman, SMC Communications Manager: jill.sherman@socialmobilitycommission.gov.uk or 07384 870965

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Listen ! A matter of leadership | Comment https://threebearsbandb.com/listen-a-matter-of-leadership-comment/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:38:19 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/listen-a-matter-of-leadership-comment/ Hugh Mackenzie We are living in difficult times these days and there are many signs that it is going to get more difficult. Inflation is higher than it has been in decades, gas prices are skyrocketing, and the cost of almost everything else is rising dramatically. I thought a meme I noticed on Facebook this […]]]>

Hugh Mackenzie

We are living in difficult times these days and there are many signs that it is going to get more difficult.

Inflation is higher than it has been in decades, gas prices are skyrocketing, and the cost of almost everything else is rising dramatically.

I thought a meme I noticed on Facebook this morning summed it up pretty well.
“My gas tank bill is starting to look like a grocery bill and my grocery bill is starting to look like a Costco bill and my Costco bill is starting to look like a mortgage payment and I don’t know how people make it possible to live well now.”

On top of that, the COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult in one way or another for most people, whether it’s illness, loss of loved ones, restrictions on lifestyle, increased care, financial hardship or isolation. Everyone took a hit, somewhere.

Globally, there is also a lack of stability with the unprovoked Russian invasion of Ukraine and the real threat of a larger war, a much higher degree of civil unrest in the United States and the global supply chain challenges.

It is no wonder that there is a climate of discontent and concern in Canada which, in some respects, has manifested itself in an undercurrent of hatred and anger. Indeed, there are signs that we will see a repeat this summer of the so-called Freedom convoys returning to Ottawa. Exactly what we don’t need.

Canada’s Ambassador to the United Nations, Bob Rae, in recent, almost Churchillian remarks, put it this way: “A truck is not a speech. A horn is not a voice. An occupation is not a protest. A blockade is not freedom, it blocks freedom for all. A request to overthrow a government is not a dialogue. The expression of hatred is not a difference of opinion. A lie is not the truth.”

Yet the hard truth, in my view, is that in many ways we are here and that has to change. The real question then is how to reverse this? My answer is that it is a matter of leadership. It is easy for the federal government to blame others for the serious problems facing Canadians right now. While there is some truth in that — the pandemic is a global problem, inflation is global, and rising conflict is global — to find ways to address these issues in Canada, the buck stops here.

For example, the rise in the price of gasoline is generally blamed on the war in Ukraine. This is only partly true. There are other sources of oil and gas that can and, given current circumstances, should also be developed here in Canada.

A recent check of gas prices in the United States, taking into account the difference in value of our dollar, revealed that it was more than 50 cents per liter cheaper than in Canada. We should ask ourselves why. The answer could be that the government gains tax revenue when gasoline prices rise. In difficult times, I believe that real leadership is not about increasing government revenue, but rather about taking action to reduce the cost of living for ordinary citizens. Why not at least a temporary reduction in gas taxes, the HST, and yes, even the many “sin” taxes? Sure, it would reduce the revenue the government could spend on pet projects, but it would also ease the burden and pressure on Canadians when times get tough.

In my opinion, we have weak leadership at the federal level in Ottawa. I include the three major parties in this statement. Jagmeet Singh and the NDP think playing Robin Hood will solve all the country’s problems. The conservatives are currently going too right and the liberals are trying too hard to be everything to everyone. It is simply not possible. But the responsibility really lies with the government and not with the opposition parties. This is where Canadians need really strong, positive and effective leadership right now. I seriously wonder if we get it.

Justin Trudeau is clearly heading towards his sell-by date, and it’s starting to show. There are also those in his Cabinet who are chomping at the bit to take his place. The good news is that three of them are women! But that could be in three years. As a journalist and former diplomat Norman Spector recently said: “While the Prime Minister is no doubt thinking of leaving, the entire government seems incapable of any initiative. As if absolutely everything in Ottawa was on autopilot. And therein lies the problem.

Many Canadians are hurting right now and worried about the future. A poll today indicates that a quarter of Canadian homeowners fear they will have to sell their homes if interest rates continue to rise.

Unless Prime Minister Trudeau wants to leave now, he must intervene. It must give hope to Canadians and it must relieve them. He needs to demonstrate how he and his government support us, instead of just saying so and blaming others for the problems we face. This would quell the frustration and anger of Canadians and lessen the effect of new “freedom” convoys, conspiracy theories and civil disobedience.

For the well-being of Canada, we better hope Prime Minister Trudeau succeeds. We simply cannot wait three more years.

Hugh Mackenzie

Hugh Mackenzie has served as a Muskoka School Board Trustee, Huntsville Councillor, District Councilor and Mayor of Huntsville. He also served as Muskoka District Council President and Chief of Staff to former Ontario Premier Frank Miller.

Hugh has also served on several provincial, federal and local boards, including Chair of the Ontario Health Disciplines Council, Vice Chair of the Ontario Family Health Network, Vice Chair of the Election Finances Commission of Ontario and a member of Roy Thomson’s Board of Directors. Hall, the National Theater School of Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada. Locally, he has served as president of the Huntsville Rotary Club, president of the Huntsville District Memorial Hospital, president of the Huntsville Hospital Foundation, president of the Huntsville Festival of the Arts, and a member of the board of directors of Community Living Huntsville.

In business, Hugh Mackenzie has a background in radio and newspaper publishing. He was also a founding partner and CEO of Canada Enterprise, a national public affairs and strategic communications firm founded in 1986.

Currently, Hugh is President of C3 Digital Media Inc., the parent company of Doppler Online, and he enjoys writing commentaries for Huntsville Doppler.

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Canceling student loans could narrow racial wealth gap, advocates say https://threebearsbandb.com/canceling-student-loans-could-narrow-racial-wealth-gap-advocates-say/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 11:30:02 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/canceling-student-loans-could-narrow-racial-wealth-gap-advocates-say/ Pictures of Nosystem | E+ | Getty Images A college education was supposed to help close the wealth gap for black Americans. Yet researchers are finding the opposite to be true, thanks to student loan debt. Median wealth of black families is less than 15% that of white families, says Federal Reserve 2019 Consumer Finance […]]]>

Pictures of Nosystem | E+ | Getty Images

A college education was supposed to help close the wealth gap for black Americans.

Yet researchers are finding the opposite to be true, thanks to student loan debt.

Median wealth of black families is less than 15% that of white families, says Federal Reserve 2019 Consumer Finance Survey. Among student borrowers, this gap is even more pronounced, research shows.

The wealth of black borrowers is about 5% of the wealth of white borrowers, according to an article by Raphael Charron-Chenier, Louise Seamster, Thomas M. Shapiro and Laura Sullivan titled “A Path to Racial Equity: Student Debt Cancellation Policy Designs.”

Learn more about Investing in You:
Why racial justice groups want Congress to restore the child tax credit
What to do with a 529 college savings plan if student debt is forgiven
Here’s how to get the most money for college

“Because education is funded by debt, our education doesn’t have the same effect,” said Seamster, assistant professor of sociology and criminology and African American studies at the University of Iowa.

“It doesn’t drive wealth for black families and, in fact, it actually exacerbates wealth inequality.”

“Student debt is really a debt trap for black borrowers.”

Higher education is increasingly expensive. Because black households tend to have less wealth, more of them have to borrow money to get a degree — and the amounts they borrow are larger than those of their white counterparts, a explained Charron-Chenier, a sociologist and assistant professor at Arizona State University. .

About 24% of black adults say they have federal student loan debt, compared to 14% of white adults, according to a CNBC + Acorn’s Invest in You Student loan survey conducted by Momentive.

Black college graduates owe an average of $7,400 more than their white peers by the time they graduate, according to a report by Brookings Institution found. Four years after graduation, they owe an average of $52,726, compared with $28,006 for the average white college graduate, according to the report, which included non-borrowers in the average.

Meanwhile, some 66% of black borrowers owe more than they originally borrowed 12 years after starting college, another analysis found.

“It’s because the interest accrued on their loans is more than the payments they can afford on their loans,” said Charlie Eaton, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Merced, who participated in the study. ‘to analyse.

“So student debt is really a debt trap for black borrowers.”

Impact of student loan cancellation on the wealth gap

MoMo Productions | Digital Vision | Getty Images

Canceling student debt can impact the racial wealth gap, though it’s not the only solution to a complex problem, advocates say. Instead, it’s a first step to addressing it, they said.

Canceling $50,000 of student debt for households with incomes below $100,000 would increase the wealth of black borrowers to 33% of the wealth of white borrowers, up from 5% previously, according to “A Pathway to Racial Equity “. Raising it to $75,000 in discount would take it to 42%, according to the report.

“While the amount itself doesn’t have a huge immediate impact on the racial wealth gap, it can help people at a really crucial time,” Charron-Chenier said.

It is during this post-college period that young adults find employment and perhaps buy a home. Yet student debt prevents many people from owning a home.

Student debt is truly a debt trap for black borrowers.

charlie eaton

Assistant Professor at University of California, Merced

“The racial wealth gap is not exclusively, but very strongly, driven by people’s ability to simply buy a home and retain its value,” Charron-Chenier pointed out.

Granted, forgiving student loans isn’t the cure for the intergenerational wealth gap, said Nicole Smith, research professor and chief economist at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

“The real intergenerational racial wealth gap that we see in American society took generations to create, and it will absolutely take generations to remove it as well,” she said.

“Even if we were to magically erase that burden from every person of color, they’re still going to be leaps and bounds behind the rest of society because it’s just such a stark difference that has been compounded by structural inequality. , through racial inequality, through racial injustice, for decades.”

How much debt should be cancelled?

U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks during the AFL-CIO’s 29th Quadrennial Constitutional Convention at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, U.S., June 14, 2022.

Evelyn Hockstein | Reuters

President Joe Biden backed the wipe of $10,000 from borrowers’ accounts. However, no decision on this matter is expected before the end of the summer, according to the Wall Street Journal. reported.

For the NAACP, $10,000 is not enough.

“It’s like throwing a bucket of ice on a wildfire,” NAACP President and CEO Derrick Johnson told CNBC recently. “The cancellation must be a minimum of $50,000.”

Some Democrats, including Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, are also asking for at least $50,000 in pardons.

Opponents of canceling student loans argue that debt forgiveness would add up to $1.7 trillion to the national debt, further fueling inflation. Several Republican senators introduced legislation in May to ban the Biden administration from canceling student loan debt.

“This decision would not only be unfair to those who have already paid off their loans or decided to pursue alternative education paths, but it would be extremely inflationary in an era of already historic inflation,” said Sen. Mitt Romney, R -Utah, in a statement.

Opponents also argue that forgiveness would worsen inequality, pointing to another Brookings Institution Report this shows that a third of all student debt is owed by the richest 20% and only 8% is owed by the poorest 20%.

The best way to close racial and socioeconomic wealth gaps includes grants and loans to colleges, income-based repayment plans, and targeted borrower aid, wrote Adam Looney of the Brookings Institution. .

While some advocates argue general relief is best, Georgetown University’s Smith agrees there should be some parameters, perhaps around income and occupation.

“It has to be measured and decisive,” she said.

Once the student debt issue is resolved, it will allow the focus to be on free and affordable college — so the cycle doesn’t continue, said Eaton of the University of California.

“Cancelling student debt will alert Congress that now is the time to create debt-free college programs so that students, including black students, don’t have to borrow for college,” he said. -he declares.

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Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Tassels.

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Senate Finance releases post-Wayfair sales tax charges https://threebearsbandb.com/senate-finance-releases-post-wayfair-sales-tax-charges/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 19:23:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/senate-finance-releases-post-wayfair-sales-tax-charges/ Small business owners told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday how the interstate scope of state and local sales taxes authorized by the Supreme Court in South Dakota vs. Wayfair, Inc., 138 S.Ct. 2080 (2018), imposed new costs and other charges. The committee also heard from an official from the United States Government Accountability Office […]]]>

Small business owners told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday how the interstate scope of state and local sales taxes authorized by the Supreme Court in South Dakota vs. Wayfair, Inc., 138 S.Ct. 2080 (2018), imposed new costs and other charges.

The committee also heard from an official from the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) to study the issue; Executive Director of the Streamlined Sales Tax (SST) State Consortium Board of Directors; and a CPA, Diane L. Yetter, who is president and founder of the Sales Tax Institute and a longtime practitioner in the area of ​​state and local sales tax compliance. The session was titled “Review of the impact of South Dakota vs. Wayfair on small businesses and distance selling.”

The business owners’ testimony received unanimous, bipartisan sympathy from senators, beginning with a statement from committee chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., that while his home state has no sales tax, Wayfair now forces its resident remote-selling retailers to navigate a “complex web of laws” across all 45 states with sales tax and thousands of local jurisdictions.

“Congress should step in and get concrete, real relief for these hurting small businesses,” Wyden said, adding that he co-sponsored the Online Sales Simplicity and Small Business Relief Act of 2019, S 2350, which would limit state sales taxes. on distance sellers.

John Hennessey, president and CEO of Littleton Coin Co. in Littleton, NH, described the challenges of the new sales tax landscape for his collectible coin business. The coin company has been in business since the mail-order catalog era but, like most such retailers, migrated to online ordering and selling when Wayfair “Immediately forced us to become the tax collector for up to 12,000 different state and local jurisdictions, with no way to calculate and collect taxes from our clients,” Hennessey said.

The company initially spent $225,000 to purchase software, hire legal and tax experts and handle other compliance tasks, Hennessey said. It continues to incur tens of thousands of dollars in expenses and hundreds of staff hours each year to maintain compliance, he said. She also encountered more types of possible state and local tax exposures beyond sales and use, including business and professional taxes, franchise taxes, and, in California, an assertion, which the company disputes. , that she should pay state income tax.

“The very complexity is a risk to our business,” Hennessey said.

If all of the various sales tax instructions to its customers under the economic nexus rules permitted by Wayfair had been printed in the company’s old print catalog, they would have required about 40 more pages, Hennessey said, holding up a printout.

Michelle Huie, whose business sells support socks, VIM & VIGR Compression Legwear, in Missoula, Mont., spoke about the bewildering variety of sales tax regimes she suddenly discovered her business was subject to. All had different rates, applicable thresholds depending on the amount of sales or the number of sales, and rules on taxable products and their uses.

“I didn’t start my business to be a sales tax expert, but I wanted to be compliant,” Huie said.

Two witnesses, who are primarily sales tax experts, said they also identify with the plight of entrepreneurs, while also acknowledging how state revenue expectations in the modern age of commoditization of online and cross-border sales were disrupted, leading the Supreme Court to conclude that its previous standard under Quill Corp. vs. North Dakota504 US 298 (1992), requiring that the sales tax nexus be based on a retailer’s physical presence in the state, was no longer clear or easily enforceable.

Craig Johnson, executive director of the Streamlined Sales Tax (SST) Board, explained how the 24-state consortium worked to simplify and standardize how states collect sales tax. More than 18,000 vendors have voluntarily registered through the SST system for centralized tax collection and remittance, he said.

“We recognize that the Wayfair This decision has brought about significant changes for remote sellers across the country, so we are working to help them comply with their collection and remittance obligations,” Johnson said.

Yetter, who also runs Yetter Tax and has spent 38 years in the sales tax field as a state auditor as well as a sales and use tax corporation and public accountant, said that sales tax collection rules should be fair to sellers, with uniform and clear requirements and guidance by states.

Although the collection and remittance of sales tax is the obligation of the business owner, Wayfair made compliance more difficult for some companies and imposed significant costs on them, Yetter said. Those compliance burdens have persisted since the ruling was issued four years ago, but Congress and states can reduce them, she said.

James McTigue Jr., director of strategic issues at GAO, said distance sales tax now accounts for about a third of all state revenue in the 45 states and the District of Columbia that have sales tax. All have adopted an economic nexus regime on distance sellers, but the thresholds, rules on small business exceptions, taxable product categories and local tax applicability all vary.

Later Tuesday, the GAO released a report incorporating McTigue’s testimony and detailing more findings, Distance Selling Tax: First Observations on the Effects of Expanding State Authority (Rep’t No. GAO-22-106016).

In response to a question from Senator John Thune, RS.D., Huie talked about another type of cost that business owners may incur besides paying for software, consultants, legal services and time. employees to manage compliance.

“Another cost that is not documented is the fear and worry about ‘Am I doing something wrong? Am I reaching the link in a state I’m not aware of?” Huy said. “And an impending or potential letter from the Department of Revenue. No small business owner wants to receive that.”

To comment on this article or suggest an idea for another article, contact Paul Bonner at Paul.Bonner@aicpa-cima.com.

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2 GOP candidates in race for SC House District 121 https://threebearsbandb.com/2-gop-candidates-in-race-for-sc-house-district-121/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 14:09:21 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/2-gop-candidates-in-race-for-sc-house-district-121/ Eric Erickson and Tim Swain are running in the SC House District 121 Republican primary. The winner will face the incumbent, Michael Rivers, a Democrat, in November. Seats are also open this year in Districts 118, 120, 122, 123, 124, but District 121 is the only one with a primary contest. Both GOP candidates received […]]]>

Eric Erickson and Tim Swain are running in the SC House District 121 Republican primary.

The winner will face the incumbent, Michael Rivers, a Democrat, in November.

Seats are also open this year in Districts 118, 120, 122, 123, 124, but District 121 is the only one with a primary contest.

Both GOP candidates received questionnaires and were asked to give their work and education, previous political experience and goals for the job.

Here are their responses:

Eric Erickson.jpg
Eric Erickson

Eric Erickson

Occupation: SC lawyer for over 25 years in Beaufort County; Erickson Law Firm LLC – principal owner; former Special Prosecutor for the South Carolina Attorney General’s Office; former court-appointed lawyer; WE. Army Emergency Physician Assistant.

Education: JD of Thomas M. Cooley Law School; University of Michigan-Master Arch & Design (no degree); Washington State University-BA

Have you ever stood for election? Yes. 2020 SC House 121

What do you think is the biggest issue facing your voters this year? What to do with the additional $4.6 billion state government surplus. I believe we can catch up on roads and bridges, give money to “mobile crisis clinics” and mental health “crisis lines” to save lives, cut the tax rate by 7 % to 6% and 3%, increase teachers’ base salaries to $40,000 per year.

If you are elected, how will you be different from the person who held this seat before? This legislative session, Michael Rivers drafted four bills and was 0-4 without passing. An example of one of his bills, H-4903, which failed was that Rivers wanted Spanish to be a “core” subject in schools. If elected, I would like to serve on the Judiciary, Medical, and Military Affairs Committees and try to pass a law that protects the names of drug companies from protesters regarding lethal injection drugs.

What is your growth philosophy? After studying at the school of architecture and being appointed member of the board of directors of the city of Port Royal Historic preservation and Design Exam over the past 14 years has prepared me to see both sides of the equation in protecting citizens from the bad development that strains communities when they give too much benefit to the developer.

Tim Swain.jpg
Tim Swain

Timothy “Tim” Swain

Occupation: Building/Construction/Estimate

Education: Some college

Have you ever been a candidate in an election: Nope

What do you think is the biggest issue facing your voters this year? Currently, the main problem everyone is facing is how much everything costs. Inflation, gas, our economy is spiraling out of control.

If you are elected, how will you be different from the person who held this seat before? The seat is currently held by a Democrat. As a Republican, I would be very different from the gentleman who sits now. I will protect your Second Amendment rights. I will make sure no one is forcing you to wear a mask or take a photo you don’t want.

What is your growth philosophy? Attracting new business is usually achieved through low taxes, operating costs and little red tape. Some areas use business liaisons to help new businesses settle in their areas to take the stress away from owners. To help existing businesses, I think we need to make sure we’re using E-Verify for our work, have more community events that promote local businesses, and again, make sure we’re not overcharging anyone with too many licenses and fees.

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About conflicting opinions https://threebearsbandb.com/about-conflicting-opinions/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:01:26 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/about-conflicting-opinions/ This week, I reflected on the volume of conflicting data bombarding the American investor. To start, Linda Duessel, Sr. Vice President and Sr. Equity Strategist at Federated Hermes posted a comment titled “I’m a glass half full kind of girl”. Because of her profession, she kind of has to be, and we’ll get to that […]]]>

This week, I reflected on the volume of conflicting data bombarding the American investor. To start, Linda Duessel, Sr. Vice President and Sr. Equity Strategist at Federated Hermes posted a comment titled “I’m a glass half full kind of girl”. Because of her profession, she kind of has to be, and we’ll get to that in a moment.

JP Morgan Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon caused a stir lately when he spoke of a “hurricane” hitting the US economy. Now, Brian Wesbury, chief economist at First Trust, said in his Monday Morning Outlook “Dimon could possibly be right, but it’s far too soon. May’s jobs report confirmed that the US economy continues to grow. »* So, what gives? At least two things. Dimon is probably the most prominent senior executive in the world of global banking/financial services. Duessel is a stock market strategist and Wesbury is an economist. Put them all in a room together and you’d expect everyone to weigh differently – and the time frame being discussed would likely cause everyone to alter their opinions. Jamie Dimon is by far the most famous, so you can expect his thoughts to deservedly get the most airtime. Add Warren Buffett to the conversation and while they may all have different opinions, others will likely defer to him simply because he’s the oldest and wealthiest. Not to mention his “grandfather” attitude. Also remember that a broken clock is accurate twice a day, so just take a position and stick to it and he/she will be right at some point. If all of this were easy, everyone would be doing it – and the vast majority of investors wouldn’t lose so much money! Making smart investment choices takes a lot of work – a little luck really helps.

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Lexington County Council Candidates in the Republican Primary https://threebearsbandb.com/lexington-county-council-candidates-in-the-republican-primary/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:57:28 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/lexington-county-council-candidates-in-the-republican-primary/ Lexington County Councilman Todd Cullum, left, and GOP chief challenger Bobby Porter. Cayce-area Republican voters will have one of the only opportunities to shape the face of Lexington County Council over the next few years. Former council chairman Todd Cullum, a 20-year-old incumbent representing District 9 on the council, faces a primary challenge from Bobby […]]]>

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Lexington County Councilman Todd Cullum, left, and GOP chief challenger Bobby Porter.

Cayce-area Republican voters will have one of the only opportunities to shape the face of Lexington County Council over the next few years.

Former council chairman Todd Cullum, a 20-year-old incumbent representing District 9 on the council, faces a primary challenge from Bobby Porter, a former South Congaree councilman who, before the last redistricting cycle, had stood previously running for office as a Democrat in another council district. .

Cullum draws on his experience as a longtime council member, while Porter said he wants to focus on issues fueled by Lexington County’s growth. Porter previously told The State that he decided to switch parties when “it was clear to me that my ideas and my ideology didn’t match any Democrat.”

In 2020, Porter ran for County Council against Gene “Bimbo” Jones as a Democrat in the Red Bank-centric District 5. When council seats were redistributed after the 2020 census, Porter’s home in South Congaree moved to District 9, which also includes Cayce and Pine Ridge.

No other candidate has shown up to run against the winner of the GOP primary in the Nov. 8 general election. Three other board incumbents — Larry Brigham, Beth Carrigg and Glen Conwell — are running unopposed.

Todd Cullum.jpg
Todd Cullum, Lexington County Councilor Lexington County

Todd Cullum

Age: 58

Education: Graduate, airport high school; Graduate, USC Columbia, BS in Finance, Insurance and Economic Security; Graduate, SC Economic Developers Association Institute; Graduate, Georgia Tech, Basic Economic Development.

Occupationn: Partner, Reeley’s Body Shop, Inc.

Previous political experience: Elected to Lexington County Council, November 2002 to present. Served as Chairman of the Board in 2005, 2006, 2016, 2017 and 2021.

What is the biggest problem facing District 9? And what are you going to do with it?

District #9’s challenges are much like the rest of the county, growing and maintaining transportation, and dealing with congestion. Specifically in District #9, there are most active sites available for industry location and job creation. Additionally, the “gateway” to our Midlands region is SC 302-Airport Blvd. This corridor needs to be improved to show a positive welcome to all visitors to our region, whether for pleasure or business.

I intend to continue to seek ways to improve our transportation system for maintenance and congestion management through alternative financial solutions; federal grants, local options funding and government/private partnerships. Industry recruitment will continue to be a top priority to create a tax base and jobs, both of which are essential to the health and growth of the county. I will continue to champion the county’s three industrial parks and aggressively seek out quality businesses to locate here. The Airport Boulevard Corridor Improvement Plan is underway and all local governments are working in tandem to engage the business community to partner with government to improve this ‘gateway to the Midlands’ corridor.

How do you plan to handle development and traffic issues as Lexington County grows?

I will continue to pursue growth plans that improve the quality of life in our county, but do not restrict investment and opportunity. Specifically, I will be advocating for the use of our new comprehensive countywide plan for future residential and commercial growth. The traffic problem has grown over the years and needs funding to make improvements. I will continue to seek new funding options that our residents can support through federal grants at the CMCOG level, SCDOT funding, and the opportunity for the public to have a say in the funding options model. local.

Bobby Porter.JPG
Bobby Porter, candidate for Lexington County Council Provided

Bobby Porter

Age: 55

Education: Bachelor of Business Administration, Campbell University ’91; Masters in Business Administration, East Carolina University ’97

Occupation: Licensed general contractor in North Carolina and South Carolina

Political experience: Congaree South Town Hall 2018-2022; Lexington County Water and Sewer Commission 2021–present

What is the biggest problem facing District 9? And what are you going to do with it?

Growth is our long-term priority facing our district today. Our infrastructure, our school system, our housing, our health care and our first responders are all affected. Planning for this continued growth is critical to advancing residential and commercial development. A haphazard approach to our overall county plan quickly allows the potential for growth to outpace our existing infrastructure. It is not difficult to determine that our roads are in dire need of repairs as well as water and sewer lines that are close to maximum capacity based on current flow and existing pumping stations.

My question is how did we get to this “catch up” position. Growth will continue in Lexington County, but it is up to county leaders to manage and control that growth. Nor do I believe that the lack of improvements is financial as state and federal funds have been made available with county tax collection. I think our county council as a whole has failed to prioritize the needs of not just District 9, but Lexington County. Once elected, I will encourage cost analysis and economic analysis to determine the impact of development on our communities. Simply, how county funds are currently being spent and opportunities for cost reduction. I believe that an open dialogue with our civic and business leaders will help identify areas in which to target our funds effectively and responsibly. Planning coupled with a comprehensive strategy will reduce the negative impact on our district and county.

Second, I believe our elected officials should lead by example while giving back to our communities in which we serve. Once elected, I propose that part of the compensation be used to support our next generation. I intend to establish a trust fund for high school students in my district providing “Youth/Adult Initiative Program” scholarships to our future leaders. We have an obligation to engage our youth as an inclusion in our county plans. Finally, I ask the citizens of District 9 in Lexington County to consider whether they and their communities are better off under current leadership or are out of touch with community needs. I intend to make changes that include all of our residents, businesses and civic leaders for an improved Lexington County and to refuse any increase in the tax burden on the citizens of District 9 of Lexington County.

How do you plan to handle development and traffic issues as Lexington County grows?

Strategic planning is the best approach to increased development and pressure on our roads. I believe that a smart and proactive approach adhering to Plans 1, 3, 5 and 10 will help and minimize some current bottlenecks, but not all. As a general contractor, I have worked on many residential and commercial projects. Our first task is to determine what the impact will be on traffic flow and counting. It is a cooperation between the developer and elected leaders to reduce congestion and road quality. I believe that a lack of oversight and communication allowed conditions to deteriorate and get worse. The county has allowed development to far exceed infrastructure capacity. Growth can be closely monitored and adjustments made accordingly. This aspect has been ignored, hence the increase in traffic jams and the deterioration of the roads.

I intend to aggressively resolve this issue by reviewing plans submitted by developers, reviewing responses, and creating communication with the state DOT to determine how we ended up in a position again of catch-up. “Good growth” is good for our county, but once it gets out of control, it reduces our quality of life. Some will say that all development is good, I believe that all “controlled” growth is positive for our communities. Not only do we have an obligation to new residents and businesses moving to Lexington County, but more importantly, those who have been here for generations need some much-needed attention.

I believe our growth projections and trajectory far exceed capacity. The question of where do we want to be in the next 3, 5, 10 years is a valid one. What steps do we want to take to get there. Is our current leadership capable of taking our community there. I believe communication, careful planning and slowing down the pace of development will give us that opportunity. The cooperation and re-engagement of our communities in decision-making processes will help alleviate many of the traffic problems they currently face.

Bristow Marchant covers local government, schools and the Lexington County community for the state. He graduated from the College of Charleston in 2007. He has over 10 years of experience covering South Carolina at the Clinton Chronicle, Sumter Item and Rock Hill Herald. He joined The State in 2016. Bristow won the 2015 SC Press Association Award for Best Series and was part of The State’s award-winning 2016 election coverage.
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Backlash Nixes Gunsmith Shop | https://threebearsbandb.com/backlash-nixes-gunsmith-shop/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://threebearsbandb.com/backlash-nixes-gunsmith-shop/ A gunsmith has withdrawn a zoning application to operate a shop on Temple Street due to public outcry over its location next to Northeast Primary School. “I feel like I got kicked in the gut,” Eric Fletcher said on Monday. “When I started all of this, it was never my intention in any form to […]]]>

A gunsmith has withdrawn a zoning application to operate a shop on Temple Street due to public outcry over its location next to Northeast Primary School.

“I feel like I got kicked in the gut,” Eric Fletcher said on Monday. “When I started all of this, it was never my intention in any form to cause distress in the community. With the current climate of things, I understand the concern.

Fletcher received a home occupancy zoning permit dated May 24 for the assembly and “substantially” but not exclusively online sale of firearms at a Temple Street address abutting the driveway of the Northeast School.

A photo of the permit and a Google map showing the location in relation to the school were part of a widely shared social media post over the weekend, with many people in the comment sections discussing how to appeal the permit.

Zoning Administrator Andrew Strniste said as of late Monday morning he had received at least 25 calls about the appeals process, for which he said he was directing people to the relevant laws in the area. ‘State.

“As far as I’m concerned, I can’t really determine who can and can’t appeal,” he said. “It’s the Design Review Board that’s an interested party.”

The law states that neighboring owners are interested parties when they can demonstrate that they could be affected by the use of the property covered by the permit.

Deputy Superintendent Rob Bliss said Monday that schools in the city of Rutland are preparing an appeal as neighboring landowners.

“Our job is to bring to their attention some things that we might find in the general zoning bylaws that might need to be revised again,” he said. “This company will prevent the use of our school.”

Bliss said the permit likely did not take into account that the property is within the 1,000-foot gun safe zone maintained around the school. He said protocols require that they “run school security” if someone with a gun is spotted in that area. He said this triggers a number of other protocols, including a 911 call putting all responders in the city on high alert.

Bliss – who stressed he has nothing against stay-at-home businesses – said a customer leaving the store with a visible firearm could trigger these protocols regardless of their intentions.

Besides the gun-specific issues, Bliss said they have questions about what kind of shipping traffic the company would bring to a neighborhood that currently has none, but has other pre-existing traffic issues. .

“I don’t know if you’ve seen our pick up and drop off times, but it’s pretty busy there already,” he said.

Fletcher said the backlash was at least partly a misunderstanding of his plans, which did not include what is commonly seen as a “gun store”.

“My intention was never to have an inventory or anything in front of a school district,” he said. “That would have been completely irresponsible.”

Fletcher said he had recently obtained a trade school certification in gunsmithing and hoped to use the Temple Street space as a workshop for occasional repairs and inspections while he looked for a more suitable location for a display case. He said he also needed space to do business in order to get some federal certifications.

Fletcher called himself a strong supporter of the Second Amendment and said that with gun ownership comes responsibilities.

“Guns are a very, very touchy subject, especially with the current climate,” he said. “The very essence of what my business was going to be was going to be safety and education.”

Fletcher said the procedures he should have followed to receive and store the firearms he worked on could have addressed some of the community’s concerns. He said he could have tried to use the appeals process to address those concerns, but also learned on Monday that the company would have changed the property tax and insurance to double his rent.

Fletcher said he still wants to start his business, but will have to rethink his plans.

“The initial blowback – it’s nothing I wanted even in a million years,” he said. “I respect the contribution of the community. Without them, I have nothing. It’s too early to tell where I’m going from here.

gordon.dritschilo @rutlandherald.com

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