Here are the 7 candidates running for the Austin District 4 City Council special election


Seven candidates entered the race to replace Greg Casar as District 4 representative of Austin City Council on January 25.

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Casar’s candidacy for a national office in Congress District 35 will result in his resignation from the board, although he will continue to serve until a new board member is sworn in for the remainder of his term. While a new city council map for the 2020s was recently finalized, this special election will be held below the current boundary of the district where Casar was elected and which was in place from 2011 to 2021.

Residents of District 4 have until December 27 to register to vote in the special elections, and early voting will run from January 10 to 21. If necessary, a second round – triggered if no candidate wins a majority of votes – is tentatively set for March 22.

Ahead of the January election, candidates for the North Central Austin district seat shared information about their background and political goals with Community impact journal. The nomination window for the election closed on December 16 and the order of candidates will appear on the ballot will be chosen at random on December 17; candidates are currently listed in alphabetical order. All applicants have been contacted for more information and this story will be updated with additional responses as they are received.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

IB:
The candidate did not respond to the request for comment at the time of posting.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

IB:
The candidate did not respond to the request for comment at the time of posting.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

MG:
The biggest problem Austin faces today is the lack of housing affordability. We have talked so much for so long about “affordable housing”; Rather, let’s talk about the necessary economic and labor opportunities that actually respond to the displacement of residents.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

MG:
If you are elected, one tangible change or policy that I would focus on implementing is ensuring that the city’s systems are fair and people-centered. Systems regarding economic and labor market opportunities, housing, access to healthy food, parks and green spaces, disaster preparedness and other issues facing vulnerable communities.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

JL:
Affordability is a central issue that is linked to many other issues we face, including housing and land use issues, and city spending, which in turn are heavily influenced by spending on housing. public safety and mobility. Tangible solutions to address the affordability problem must come from the real needs of the community rather than from the perceived needs of the community or from special interests. I think we can tackle this problem on more than one front: first, by strongly supporting and encouraging affordable housing; second, by controlling extravagant urban spending which, in practice, often functions as a regressive tax on those who can least afford it; and finally, objectively and critically examining the appropriate location of density that does not interfere with established neighborhoods or community displacement. Consideration of short and long term factors is crucial in the decision making process. I will specifically represent District 4; however, I realize that I will have a voice for all citizens of Austin.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

JL:
Transparency and access to the city for the citizens of Austin. Genuine community engagement, equity and inclusion in municipal operations and systems that provide accurate and unbiased information and guidance to residents who have a concern or interest in a given issue. Any Austin resident should be welcome and able to navigate the system easily, getting truthful answers and instructions. This is not currently the case. We do not have an effective process in place that captures citizen feedback and concerns.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

AR:
The biggest issues Austin faces are public safety and affordability.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

AR:
I would make sure public safety is properly funded, and the council is focused on strategies that will lower the cost of living for Austin residents.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

MRS:
Affordable housing. District 4 should be a leader in increasing density and showing that the densest neighborhood in the neighborhood is ready to add density and affordable housing, especially along the future Orange Line.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

MRS:
Melinda sees multiple communication blocks to solve our local issues, even basic needs that residents care about. Melinda’s communications priorities include building a multilingual platform for community education and support, building a coalition of volunteer apartments to provide tenant support, surveying residents of District 4 on local infrastructure needs, inventorying all abandoned vehicles and improving their removal process, and working with APD for accountability on public safety issues.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

LAUGH :
Rising cost of living, evictions, slumlords. … Congestion, state of roads / infrastructure, lack of emergency winter preparation.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

LAUGH :
As winter approaches, a small emergency fleet of snow plows / road salt trucks in town would be a good idea: you don’t have to prepare, if you are ready baby.

What’s the biggest problem Austin faces today?

JV:
Austin is facing a growing housing crisis that displaces many of our working class residents. Our city must be a welcoming place for working class people, not a playground for the rich. Soaring housing prices are bringing out all the unique and interesting people who make Austin so special. We need to make room for our brothers and sisters who cannot afford $ 500,000 housing.

What tangible change or policy would you focus on implementing if elected?

JV:
I was a strong supporter of Project Connect, and a top priority will be to ensure that this massive light rail project is completed on time and on budget. I will also advocate for the construction of accessible housing along the new rail lines so that newcomers to Austin do not increase traffic. District 4 also needs major investments in infrastructure, especially in sidewalks and parks. Many streets and intersections in District 4 are dangerous for pedestrians. The intersection of 183 and North Lamar, for example, needs to be safe for pedestrians, especially children going to school.


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